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  • Admissions Tip: Crafting Strong Essays–The Rewards of Reflection

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    With several of the leading schools having already released their essay questions for this admissions season, we're sure that quite a number of early birds are eager to get a jump on the process in order to complete as many applications as possible by round one. As applicants find themselves brainstorming for essay topics, we wanted to offer a few tips on presenting yourself and your experiences as advantageously as possible.

    1) Take time to reflect.

    While it's important that you have a wide range of stories to tell and positive characteristics to convey, there are a few things that you shouldn't mention in your essays. In terms of chronology, remember that you are applying to graduate school and that admissions committees are primarily interested in your experiences since the time you began college. There are of course some exceptions to this (such as questions that ask you to recap your life story or discuss what matters most to you), but as a general rule it's best to avoid writing at length about your high school accomplishments or your upbringing, as this can make an applicant sound immature or stuck in the past. Other topics of which you should steer clear are those that are potentially sensitive or emotionally charged, such as politics and religion.

    2) Establish balance.

    It is crucial that your essays work together to present a consistent and compelling picture of who you are, what you've done, and what you bring to the table; admissions committees are looking for students who are interesting, well-rounded, and likely to make a contribution to the school, both in and out of the classroom. In selecting topics for your essays, from your list of possibilities, remember that it's ideal to have a balance of stories covering your full career and to introduce your interests and involvements outside of work.

    3) Keep it relevant.

    While it's important that you have a wide range of stories to tell and positive characteristics to convey, there are a few things that you shouldn't mention in your essays. In terms of chronology, remember that you are applying to graduate school and that admissions committees are primarily interested in your experiences since the time you began college. There are of course some exceptions to this (such as questions that ask you to recap your life story or discuss what matters most to you), but as a general rule it's best to avoid writing at length about your high school accomplishments or your upbringing, as this can make an applicant sound immature or stuck in the past. Other topics of which you should steer clear are those that are potentially sensitive or emotionally charged, such as politics and religion.

    4) Show, don't tell.

    Keep in mind that an admissions committee often spends only fifteen or twenty minutes on each application. As a result, it is imperative that you make an impression and give the reader a clear sense of who you are and what you've done. Specific anecdotes and vivid details make a much greater impact than general claims and broad summaries. Be sure to quantify your impact, fully explain your actions, and provide illustrative examples to produce a set of engaging essays.

    Happy writing! Stay tuned to this blog throughout the summer for additional essay-specific tips and guidelines. Feel free to contact us for a free initial consult on your candidacy and to speak with one of our admissions counselors on how to best approach your target schools' essay topics.

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