Students Say

Franklin & Marshall College is “a small, focused liberal arts college dedicated to giving every student the opportunity to succeed.” Known for its “extremely high academic standards” and “great faculty accessibility,” the school is “about furthering academic achievement and providing superior skills and opportunities for success after graduation.”

Overview

Applicants
5,472
Acceptance Rate
39%
Average HS GPA
3.80

GPA Breakdown

51%
Over 3.75
22%
3.50 - 3.74
17%
3.25 - 3.49
8%
3.00 - 3.24
2%
2.50 - 2.99

Test Scores

SAT Reading
590 - 680
SAT Math
630 - 710
ACT Composite
27 - 30

Deadlines

Early Decision
November 15

Early Decision II
January 15

Regular
January 15

Other Admission Factors

Academic

Rigor of Secondary School Record
Class Rank
Academic GPA
Non-Academic

Character / Personal Qualities

Overall

Students Say

Franklin & Marshall College is “a small, focused liberal arts college dedicated to giving every student the opportunity to succeed.” Known for its “extremely high academic standards” and “great faculty accessibility,” the school is “about furthering academic achievement and providing superior skills and opportunities for success after graduation.” Many students say, “F&M is all about good undergrad programs and tight-knit networking,” and students laud the opportunity to make connections in their chosen fields. The college has “a slight emphasis on the sciences,” which makes an English major grumble, “Some really fantastic humanities programs lack in administrative support whereas science programs get everything and anything they want.” Nevertheless, the college’s “policy of deferring major declaration until sophomore year…allows undecided students to really find a major that suits their interests.” The faculty gets good marks for being available to students outside the classroom, but students acknowledge that, “as with many things, professors vary widely in style and quality.” A sophomore notes, “Some are very difficult but interesting; some are very boring, etc. There are enough wonderful professors to go around, though.” Many students complain about the course registration process saying it can be “competitive and difficult to get into desired classes.”

Faculty and Class Information

Student/Faculty
9:1
Total Faculty
276
with Terminal Degree
243

150
Men
126
Women
29
Minority

Most frequent class size
10 - 19
Most frequent lab / sub section size
10 - 19

Graduation Rates

Graduate in 4 years
95%
Graduate in 5 years
99%
Graduate in 6 years
100%


Degrees

Bachelor's

Career Services

On-Campus Job Interviews Available
Yes

Career Services

Alumni Network
Alumni Services
Classes
Interest Inventory
Internships
Regional Alumni
Opportunities at School

Internship

Prominent Alumni


William Gray
Retired Pres., United Negro College Fund

Kenneth Duberstein
White House Chief of Staff, Pres. Reagan

James Lapine
playwright

Kenneth Mehlman
Chair, Republican National Committee

Mary Shapiro
President, NASDAQ Regulation, Inc.

Treat Williams
Actor

Dates

Financial Aid Rating
96
Application Deadlines
Feb 15
Notification Date
Apr 1

Required Forms

FAFSA
Forms CSSProfile
Forms Divorced Parent

Bottom Line

The basic tuition at F&M currently stands at $46,185. Student housing costs range from $7,300 to $8,590 depending on the rooming situation. Meal plans and other fees bring up the room and board total to an average of $12,010. While F&M meets 100 percent of students’ financial needs, they do not offer merit-based scholarships.

Bang For Your Buck

“We all know that we’re paying $52,000 a year to be here, it’s no secret,” one student says. However, roughly half of the student body receives needs-based financial aid. F&M is committed to meeting 100 percent of student’s financial needs. The school determines those needs “based on an institutional methodology that analyzes family income, assets, and other circumstances.” The school eliminated merit-based scholarships—which one student calls “a huge mistake”—in order to commit to enrolling “highly qualified students who could not otherwise afford a Franklin & Marshall College education.” The school does provide students with resources to find merit-based scholarships awarded by outside institutions.

Financial Aid Statistics

Average Freshman Total Need-Based Gift Aid
$41,770

Average Undergraduate Total Need-Based Gift Aid
$39,564

Average Need-Based Loan
$4,253

Average amount of loan debt per graduate
$27,474

Undergraduates who have borrowed through any loan program
46%

Average amount of each freshman scholarship/grant package
$45,769

Financial aid provided to international students
Yes

Expenses per Academic Year

Tuition
$48,414
Required Fees
$100
Average Cost for Books and Supplies
$1,200

Tuition / Fees Vary by Year of Study
No
Board for Commuters
$3,676
Transportation for Commuters
$100

Available Aid

Financial Aid Methodoloy
Federal and Institutional

Scholarships and Grants
Need-Based College/University Scholarship or Grant Aid from Institutional Funds
Need-Based Federal Pell
Need-Based Private Scholarships
Need-Based SEOG
Need-Based State Scholarships

Federal Direct Student Loan Programs
Direct PLUS Loans
Direct Subsidized Stafford Loans
Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans

Federal Family Education Loan Programs (FFEL)
College/university loans from institutional funds
Federal Perkins Loans

Is Institutional Employment Available (other than Federal Work Study)
Yes

Direct Lender
Yes

Overall

Students Say

At F&M, the motto seems to be, “Work hard, play hard.” Students say they take their academics seriously, but “because the work is so demanding, on weekends everyone gets pretty crazy.” Greek life is a predominant part of the social scene, and some say, “On weekends, it’s pretty much the only outlet for socializing.” Many say the student body is “preppier and more Greek than you’d expect” and that “the typical student is Caucasian, upper-middle-class, from the tristate area” and looks like “a J. Crew model.” However, a neuroscience major says, “While Greek life seems to dominate campus, after one or two years you come to realize that there is a lot more to do for fun,” and another student adds, “It’s a very laid-back lifestyle so people like to relax and enjoy time with their friends.” A junior says, “In reality, everyone has their ‘thing’ that they’re involved in,” and in general “students are friendly and pleasant, but they tend to stick to themselves and their small groups of friends.” However, many agree that, “For a small school, there is an enormous variety of things to do,” and they say, “on any given weekend you can find people all over campus, whether it be at the artsy green room theatre, the library…in the college center, in a friend’s apartment, or at a frat party.”

Student Body Profile

Total Undergraduate Enrollment
2,209
Out of State
76%

International
16%
Foreign Countries Represented
49

Demographics

5.38%
Asian
6.45%
African-American
9.43%
Hispanic
68.98%
Caucasian
7.30%
Unknown
15.88%
International

51% female
49% male
76% are out of state
98% are full time
2% are part time

Overview

Students Say

F&M boasts a “lush and beautiful campus” with “state-of-the-art educational and living facilities” and “a strong community feel.” Students say, “Events are constantly being organized, and there’s always something interesting going on if you take the time to participate.” Students also point out, “If you see that there is a need for a new school group, you can definitely petition for it, and the school will back you up. F&M cares a lot about on-campus diversity.” Overall, it’s a, “close-knit student body,” and students feel that “as an F&M student, you are not a number or a name on a class roster, you are an active contributor on campus.” However, students are torn on the issue of school spirit, with some feeling it’s strong and others griping that “school spirit is laughable.” “There isn’t enough student involvement and enthusiasm with clubs and activities.” However, all students agree that “the school could stand to improve on campus dining.” There are complaints about the mandatory four-year residency requirement, particularly among upperclassmen who feel it “needs to be modified” because it “makes housing far more expensive than it should be.” Some feel the administration can be “hard to work with” and think the college should “streamline administrative departments” to “decrease wasteful spending.”

Campus Life

Undergrads living on campus
97%
Help finding off-campus housing
Yes

Quality of life rating
74
First-Year Students living on campus
100%

Campus Environment
Suburban
Fire safety rating
93

Housing Options

Apartment Single
Disabled Student
Dorms Coed
Frat Sorority
Theme Housing

Special Needs Admissions


College Entrance Tests Required
No

Interview Required
No

Special Need Services Offered


Student Activities

Registered Student Organizations
115
Number of Honor Societies
13

Number of Social Sororities
4
Number of Religious Organizations
8

24% join a fraternity
36% join a sorority

Sports

Athletic Division
Division III

Men's Sports (Diplomats)
14 Sports

Baseball
Basketball
Crew Rowing
Cross Country
Football
Golf
Lacrosse
Soccer
Squash
Swimming
Tennis
Track Field Indoor
Track Field Outdoor
Wrestling
Women's Sports (Diplomats)
14 Sports

Basketball
Crew Rowing
Cross Country
Field Hockey
Golf
Lacrosse
Soccer
Softball
Squash
Swimming
Tennis
Track Field Indoor
Track Field Outdoor
Volleyball

Student Services

Health
Womens Center
LGBT Support Groups
Minority Support Groups
Army ROTC Offered at cooperating institutions: Millersville University

Sustainability

At Franklin & Marshall, environmental stewardship and sustainability are addressed through the college’s academic programs in environmental science, geoscience, biology, environmental studies, and public policy. These interdisciplinary majors and programs offer opportunities for extensive student-faculty collaborative research, as well as participation in green living and learning initiatives at the Spalding and Millport Conservancies, the Wohlsen Center for the Sustainable Environment, and the Sustainability House. The Campus Sustainability Committee promotes sustainability initiatives on campus. The Environmental Speakers Series provides lectures throughout the year, and the Wohlsen Center runs a bicycle-sharing program as well as Sustainability Week each year. Dining halls are trayless, and all new facilities are required to seek LEED Silver certification or its equivalent. Recycling is available in all campus buildings. Sustainability House students live together in a residence featuring a solar energy array, low-flow water system, efficient lighting, used furniture and composting—all innovations suggested by the residents. The Environmental Action Alliance (a student club) runs a fair trade café, and its so-called “Dirt Army” grows organic produce at the school’s community garden. Franklin & Marshall students will be the future of environmental sustainability; a member of the faculty, former regional director of EPA, guides students to internships and jobs at the EPA. Faculty in Earth and Environment, as well as Biology, in consultation with Career Services and Alumni Programs, help place students in green graduate programs, internships, and jobs.

Green Rating
85
Data provided by Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE), STARS®, as of February, 2014.

Campus Security Report

Campus Security Report

The Jeanne Clery Act requires colleges and universities to disclose their security policies, keep a public crime log, publish an annual crime report and provide timely warnings to students and campus employees about a crime posing an immediate or ongoing threat to students and campus employees.

Please visit The Princeton Review’s page on campus safety for additional resources: http://www.princetonreview.com/safety

The Princeton Review publishes links directly to each school's Campus Security Reports where available. Applicants can also access all school-specific campus safety information using the Campus Safety and Security Data Analysis Cutting Tool provided by the Office of Postsecondary Education of the U.S. Department of Education: http://ope.ed.gov/security


Other Information

Campus-wide Internet Network
Yes

Email and Web Access Available
Yes

% of Classrooms with Wireless Internet
100

Number of Computer Labs / Classrooms
24

Average Number of PC's per Lab
11

Network Access in Dorm Rooms
Yes

Network Access in Dorm Lounges
Yes

Fee for Network Use
No

Student Web Pages Permitted
Yes

Student Web Pages Provided
No

Partnerships with Technology Companies
No

Online Class Registration Available
Yes

Personal computer included in tuition for each student
No

Require Undergraduates to Own Computers
No

Undergraduates that Own Computers
90%

Discounts Available with Hardware Vendors
Yes

Description
Apple Inc.

Webcasting, Digital Audio or Video-Streaming of Courses
Yes

Webcasting, Digital Audio or Video-Streaming of Campus Radio / TV Stations
Yes

Campus Visits Contact

Contact
Kim Bryan
Campus Visit Coordinator

Address
Office of Admission
P.O. Box 3003
Lancaster, PA 17604

Phone
717-291-3951

Email
kimberlee.bryan@fandm.edu

Experience College Life

Most Popular Places On Campus
Alumni Sport and Fitness Center
Barshinger Center in Hensel Hall
Barnes and Noble Bookstore and Jazzman's Cafe
Roschel Performing Arts Center
Writers House

Most Popular Places Off Campus
Central Market
The Fulton Opera House
Tanger and Rockvale Square Outlet Malls
Hersheypark (20 minutes from campus)
Wheatland (Pres. James Buchanan's home)

Campus Tours

Campus Visiting Center
Monday-Friday; select Saturdays
8:30am-5pm; 9:30am-noon
717-291-3951

Campus Tours
Appointment Required: No
Dates: Year-round
Times: Varies
Average Length: 1 hour

On Campus Interview

Campus Interviews
Yes

Information Sessions
Available

Times
Contact Admission office for details

Faculty and Coach Visits

Dates/Times Available
Academic Year

Arrangements
Contact Admissions Office

Advance Notice
2 weeks

Contact Email Address for Visit
http://www.fandm.edu/visit/admission-vis

Class Visits

Dates/Times Available
Academic Year

Arrangements
Contact Admissions Office

Overnight Dorm Stays

Overnight Dorm Stays
Not Available

Transportation

Types of Transportation Available to Campus
Harrisburg International Airport is a 40-minute drive from campus. Rental cars are available at the airport. Amtrak trains provide regular east/west daily service to Lancaster. Continental Trailways buses also provide regular daily bus service to Lancaster.

Driving Instructions to Campus
From Rt. 30 in Lancaster, take the Harrisburg Pike Exit. Follow Harrisburg Pike East (toward downtown Lancaster) approximately 2 miles. FandM will be on your right. For more detailed information please refer to: http://www.fandm.edu/x1981.xml

Local Accommodations
Lancaster Arts Hotel 300 Harrisburg Avenue 866.720.ARTS Eden Resort Inn 222 Eden Rd (717)569-6444 Hampton Inn 545 Greenfield Rd (717)299-1200 Hilton Garden Inn 101 Granite Run Dr (717)560-0880 Holiday Inn East 521 Greenfield Rd. (717)299-2551 Ramada Inn 2250 Lincoln Hwy. East (717)393-5499 Sleep Inn US Route 30 Mountville Exit (717)285-0444 King's Cottage (Bed and Breakfast) 1049 E. King Street (717)397-1017 Mainstay Suites US Route 30 Mountville Exit (717)285-1779
Franklin & Marshall College campus - Image 0
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Key Stats

5,472
Applicants
2,209
Size
39%
Acceptance Rate
1300
SAT Scores

Rankings & Lists