Our History


From grade school to grad school: we’ve got you covered!

The Princeton Review is a one-stop shop for getting into your dream school. From test prep courses to private tutoring, on-demand homework help and admission counseling – we have all the tools to ensure you achieve your educational goals.
2016

The SAT changes

It reverts back to the 1600 scale and strives to be more closely aligned to high school coursework.
2016

The MCAT changes

Three new sections are added: Biochemistry, Psychology and Sociology. The test doubles in length going from three hours and twenty minutes to six hours and fifteen minutes.
2015

NASDAQ: MTCH

The Match Group (MTCH) goes public, including The Princeton Review as a leading education platform online and offline.
2015

Bye cursive!

45 states have dropped the requirement to teach cursive writing from the curriculum.
2012

The GRE changes

The exam is no longer adaptive on a question-by-question basis, but on a section basis.
2011

Common Core launches

2009

Penn Foster joins us!

The Princeton Review acquires Penn Foster, a leader in virtual education.
2009

MCAT changes

The MCAT moves from a paper test to a computer-based test and is offered multiple times throughout the year.
2007

ACT vs SAT

The ACT adds an optional writing section to compete with the SAT essay requirement.
2005

The SAT changes

Analogies were removed from the Verbal section, and quantitative comparisons were removed from the Math section. A writing section was added that included an essay. This new test is more difficult due to the rising number of perfect scores.
2005

The Higher Education Act

The Higher Education Act is amended and reauthorized, expanding access to higher education for low and middle income students.
2003

No Child Left Behind

Major national law passed by Congress. In exchange for more federal aid, the states were required to measure progress and punish schools that were not meeting the goals as measured by standardized state exams in math and language skills.
2002

NASDAQ: REVU

The Princeton Review (REVU) becomes a publicly traded company.
2001

Online Test Prep

The Princeton Review accelerates the growth of its online ventures, including new online test-preparation courses.
2000

The GMAT changes

An Analytical Writing Assessment is added to measure critical thinking and communication skills. The exam is administered in a computer-adaptive (CAT) format.
1994

The SAT changes

More passage-based reading questions are added to mimic typical college-level reading; antonyms are removed from the verbal section, and calculators are permitted on the math section along with the addition of student response questions.
1994

PrincetonReview.com

The company launches its website, PrincetonReview.com, as one of the first dotcoms on the Internet.
1993

The MCAT changes

Passage-based questions are added so schools can measure student’s critical thinking skills.
1992

The internet is invented!

1990

The ACT changed

Natural Science was replaced with Science Reasoning and Social Studies was replaced with Reading. Trigonometry and Pre-Algebra were added to the Math section and the English section moved its focus from grammar to writing skills.
1989

We help Grad students too

The Princeton Review begins a national rollout of courses for the graduate school prep courses, including LSAT, GMAT, MCAT, and GRE.
1988

The Princeton Review Foundation

The Princeton Review Foundation is launched to develop programs that address the needs of underrepresented students.
1987

Our first book is a New York Times bestseller!

The Princeton Review signs its first book success! Soon after, Cracking the SAT becomes a New York Times bestseller.
1984

The Princeton Review is born

Founder John Katzman prepares 15 students for the SAT in New York City. He incorporates extensive computer analysis of test performance and a systematic approach to achieving higher test scores. He calls his course The Princeton Review.
1981

About The Princeton Review

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