College of William and Mary campus

Overview

Applicants
14,952
Acceptance Rate
34%
Average HS GPA
4.19

GPA Breakdown

92%
Over 3.75
6%
3.50 - 3.74
1%
3.25 - 3.49

Test Scores

Learn about new SAT scores and college admission here
SAT Reading
25th-75th percentile (enrolled students)
630 - 730
SAT Math
25th-75th percentile (enrolled students)
630 - 730
SAT Writing
25th-75th percentile (enrolled students)
620 - 720
ACT Composite
25th-75th percentile (enrolled students)
28 - 32

Testing Policies


ACT Writing Policy
ACT with or without Writing accepted

SAT Essay Policy
SAT with or without Writing accepted

Deadlines

Early Decision
November 1

Regular
January 1

Other Admission Factors

Academic

Rigor of Secondary School Record
Class Rank
Academic GPA
Standardized Test Scores
Application Essay
Recommendation(s)
Non-Academic

Extracurricular Activities
Talent / Ability
Character / Personal Qualities
State Residency
Volunteer Work
Work Experience

Selectivity Rating

Faculty and Class Information

Student/Faculty
:1
Total Faculty
with Terminal Degree


Most frequent lab / sub section size
2 - 9


Graduation Rates

Graduate in 4 years
82%
Graduate in 5 years
89%
Graduate in 6 years
90%

Majors

  • Area, Ethnic, Cultural, and Gender Studies

  • African-American/Black Studies
  • American/United States Studies/Civilization
  • Ethnic Studies
  • Latin American Studies
  • Women's Studies

  • Biological and Biomedical Sciences

  • Biology/Biological Sciences, General
  • Neuroscience

  • Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services

  • Banking and Financial Support Services
  • Business Administration and Management, General
  • Marketing/Marketing Management, General

  • Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services

  • Computer and Information Sciences, General

  • English Language and Literature/Letters

  • English Language and Literature, General

  • Foreign languages, literatures, and Linguistics

  • Chinese Language and Literature
  • Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, General
  • French Language and Literature
  • German Language and Literature
  • Linguistics
  • Spanish Language and Literature

  • History

  • History, General

  • Mathematics and Statistics

  • Mathematics, General

  • Multi/Interdisciplinary Studies

  • Medieval and Renaissance Studies
  • Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, Other

  • Natural Resources and Conservation

  • Environmental Studies

  • Parks, Recreation, Leisure, and Fitness Studies

  • Kinesiology and Exercise Science

  • Philosophy and Religious Studies

  • Philosophy
  • Religion/Religious Studies

  • Physical Sciences

  • Chemistry, General
  • Geology/Earth Science, General
  • Physics, General

  • Psychology

  • Psychology, General

  • Public Administration and Social Service Professions

  • Public Policy Analysis

  • Social Sciences

  • Anthropology
  • Economics, General
  • International Relations and Affairs
  • Political Science and Government, General
  • Sociology

  • Visual and Performing Arts

  • Art/Art Studies, General
  • Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, General
  • Music, General


Students Say

Students at The College of William & Mary are extraordinarily happy with their overall experience and with their academics in particular. One student sums up the school's vibe by saying, "William & Mary achieves a remarkable balance between the dynamic, progressive academics of a liberal arts college and the strong sense of history and tradition one would expect from America's second-oldest school." "There are endless and amazing" opportunities here, with an emphasis on undergraduate research that makes W&M unique among small liberal arts schools. "Professors will engage you outside of the classroom and give you the opportunity to conduct your own research project, even in a non-science curriculum." Many "are often in newspapers and magazines and have relevant and copious work experience in the subjects they're teaching." Across the board, "professors are one of the best things about W&M." They "are always accessible for extra help," and "they also really take the time to get to know their students outside of the classroom." In the classroom, "William & Mary professors truly know how to balance lecture with discussion. Especially in traditionally lecture-based subjects, like history, professors devote a lot of class time to discussion to understand what students think." Slackers take note: "Professors expect a lot of work outside of class," and "classes usually require a good amount of reading, especially for the humanities." All this hard work is very rewarding, though, with many upperclassmen and graduating seniors expressing how well-prepared they feel for the "real-world," and one student says that the professors "have upended the way I thought about their subject, opening completely new veins of inquiry."

Degrees

Bachelor's
Doctoral
Doctoral/Professional
Doctoral/Research
Master's
Post-Bachelor's certificate
Post-Master's certificate

Career Services

On-Campus Job Interviews Available
Yes

Career Services

Alumni Network
Alumni Services
Classes
Interest Inventory
Internships
Opportunities at School

Experiential
Internship

Notable Faculty


Prominent Alumni


Thomas Jefferson
President of the United States

James Monroe
President of the United States

John Marshall
Chief Justice of the United States

David Brown
Columbia Space Shuttle Astronaut

Glenn Close
Actress

Jon Stewart
Host of Comedy Central's The Daily Show

Mike Tomlin
Head Coach of the Pittsburgh Steelers

Academic Rating

Graduation Rates

Graduate in 4 years
82%
Graduate in 5 years
89%
Graduate in 6 years
90%

Career Services

On-Campus Job Interviews Available
Yes

Career Services

Alumni Network
Alumni Services
Classes
Interest Inventory
Internships
Opportunities at School

Experiential
Internship

ROI & Outcomes

Information from PayScale:

Starting Median Salary (Up to Bachelor's degree completed, only)
$44,600

Mid-Career Median Salary (Up to Bachelor's degree completed, only)
$95,500

Starting Median Salary (At least Bachelor's degree)
$45,500

Mid-Career Median Salary (At least Bachelor's degree)
$97,300

Percent High Job Meaning
47%

Percent STEM
15%


Students Say

The Cohen Career Center begins educating students about their opportunities in the early days of freshman and sophomore year with Compass, a “menu” of events for underclassmen, like Majors, Milk and Cookies that demystifies the major selection process. The Center hosts a fair number of recruiting events on campus including the Fall Recruiting consortium which gives students the chance to apply for an interview with various companies all in one location. Tribe pride is fierce at William & Mary, and students are encouraged to speed network or seek one-on-one mentorship through the Tribe Partners Program, made up of alumni, parents, and friends of the college. Grads who visited PayScale.com report an average starting salary of $44,500, and 47 percent believe their work holds a high level of meaning.

Colleges that Create Futures

Hands-on Coursework

For the entering class of fall 2015, William & Mary rolled out a new general education curriculum designed to help students explore various academic disciplines and make meaningful connections between them, as well as expand their perspectives on the world and provide active, inquiry-based learning that breaks students out of their comfort zones—and out of their classrooms. This game-changing strategy is the brainchild of the university’s excellent and dedicated professors. Says Dr. Eugene Tracy, chair of the physics department, “The recent curriculum overhaul . . . [was] led by the faculty through a long series of committee discussions, open meetings, deliberation, and debate. The administration played a supporting role, and once the faculty decided what we wanted to do, they help us to make the new curriculum a reality.”
For incoming first-years, this means enrollment in two classes (COLL 100 and COLL 150) that immediately ground them in the university and its incredible resources, challenge them to the rigors of college-level study, and sharpen their communication skills. In later years, students are asked to step outside the university setting and interact with different cultures or environments, and then participate in a capstone experience by, say, problem-solving in an applied setting or creating entirely original scholarship. “It is sometimes said that an education is what you need when you encounter a problem your skills didn’t equip you to handle,” one professor wisely notes. This updated, all-new curriculum is designed to provide just that support and personal development to students.
Service Learning

For first-years looking to jumpstart careers in activism, there’s the Sharpe Community Scholars, a program hosted by the Charles Center for Academic Excellence that combines academic study with community engagement. Each year, between sixty and seventy-five incoming do-gooders enroll in specialized coursework and commit at least five hours a week to outside research, mentorship, collaboration, and action that benefits others—and that prepares them for a lifetime of service to the greater good. “There are some skills that are better learned through practice and experience than just a professor lecturing,” reports a recent grad. “For me, I’ve been able to realize my own abilities and interests in terms of service, and how I can work toward making a stronger community.” But passion for giving back extends well beyond first-year studies. Often through the Office of Community Engagement, students at William & Mary complete more than 30,000 hours of community service each year, and an amazing 70 percent of students volunteer—two feats that have landed the school on the President’s Honor Roll for Service six years in a row and counting. In fact, William & Mary has been recognized as one of the top producers of Peace Corps volunteers over the last decade. “Our students are working now to make the world a better place rather than waiting until graduation,” one international relations/environmental studies student proudly remarked.
Undergraduate Research

Despite the word “college” in its name, William & Mary is actually a university. The school explains, “Part of what makes us a university is that we make more than our share of a university’s contributions to the creation of knowledge—otherwise known as research and scholarship.” As Dr. Lu Ann Homza, professor of history, attests, “This is perhaps the single thing which W&M does best: meaningful undergraduate student research with the intensive mentorship of faculty. Such experiences can occur at any time in a typical undergraduate career, from freshman through senior years.” In fact, it’s quite possible for undergraduates to leave as published authors in peer-reviewed journals. In addition to capstone experiences within many of the majors, about 10 percent of seniors undergo research projects though the Department Honors Program, which gives them the opportunity to complete an extended research project (over two semesters) under the mentorship of a faculty adviser. Students write up their findings in a thesis, which they will orally defend at an annual Honors Colloquium at the end of the semester.
The Charles Center even offers a “kickstarter” through which students can raise funding for their thesis projects. There are summer research options as well as student-faculty research. Dr. Homza enumerates a few recent projects: “We have professors in Biology who routinely supervise students in testing for mercury contamination in Virginia rivers; professors in Sociology and Hispanic Studies who take students to the Arizona-Mexico border to study illegal immigration; professors in Anthropology and Geology who sponsor students on field trips to Hawaii and Oman. Yours truly takes groups of undergraduates to Pamplona, Spain, over Spring Break to allow them to read legal cases from the seventeenth century, which are held in state archives. In March 2015, a professor in German Studies led ten undergraduates along the Rhine River in Germany to explore the migration routes of medieval Jews.” William & Mary’s accessible size means that it can provide research opportunities for undergraduates that other schools fill with graduate students.
Faculty Mentors

With more than 600 full-time faculty members at William & Mary, the student-to-teacher ratio clocks in at an awesome 12:1—one of the lowest in the nation—and an impressive 85 percent of classes have fewer than forty students. But the student-faculty relationship is about more than nice numbers: “The professors here are frequently the nation’s and world’s leading figures in their field,” shares one linguistics/government major. “They are nothing short of inspiring.” And with former faculty members like George Wythe (the nation’s first law professor, who schooled the likes of Thomas Jefferson) and William Barton Rogers (founder of a little school called the Massachusetts Institute of Technology), it’s no surprise that William & Mary continues to draw top-tier researchers and scholars. Despite their high standing, W&M professors are also incredibly approachable and enthusiastic about their work in the classroom—an opinion echoed by pretty much the entire student body. “Professors at W&M are dedicated to both teaching and research… They conduct their own research (and gladly share research opportunities with undergraduate students), yet still find time to be extremely accessible to ensure that you get a quality education,” reports a student of biology and Chinese. Turns out all this respect is a two-way street: “What I am most proud of is when I go to faculty social events, and hear my colleagues brag about their students,” says Dr. Eugene Tracy, chair of the physics department. “We are amazed by them, and want to help them succeed.”
Alumni Network

William & Mary has been cranking out incredible graduates since its doors opened in 1693. Three American presidents (Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, and John Tyler) once roamed its halls, as did Speaker of the House Henry Clay and U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall. All in all, sixteen signers of the Declaration of Independence attended the university. Not surprisingly, this track record of excellence is one of the university’s main appeals today. A recent graduate from the government department told us, “It was important for me to attend a school with a strong historical tradition. I wanted to constantly be surrounded by the inspiration of those who had come before me.” More recently, its exceptional alumni include Robert Gates, former U.S. Secretary of Defense; NASA astronaut David M. Brown; Emmy- and Tony-award winning actress Glenn Close; and Emmy-award winning host of The Daily Show, Jon Stewart.
Once graduates have sprung out into the real world, the alumni network can prove a valuable resource in job hunting. “The College has provided me with both the personal development and professional network to set me on the path for a successful career,” says one former student body president. “Already in . . . my career, I have been extended opportunities from alumni of the College that have placed me on my current trajectory. It is the shared experiences of academic rigor, extracurricular passions, and commitment to service that allow alumni to have confidence in each other.”

Dates

Application Deadlines
Notification Date
Mar 15

Required Forms

FAFSA
Forms CSSProfile

Bottom Line

William & Mary is truly a steal for Virginia residents. The cost of in-state tuition, room and board, and fees is about $30,350 per year. Students from outside Virginia pay about double that amount. Financial aid is ample with 75 percent of student need met on average.

Bang For Your Buck

William & Mary does a stellar job of meeting the financial need of its students: 100 percent of demonstrated financial need is met for Virginian residents, and approximately 64 percent of demonstrated need is met for nonresidents. In addition, the William & Mary Promise guarantees in-state tuition will remain the same for all four years for each incoming class. In addition to need-based aid, William & Mary offers merit-based scholarships. The 1693 Scholarship provides the equivalent of in-state tuition and general fees, room and board, and a $5,000 stipend for research. In addition, the William & Mary Scholar Award is presented each year to a select group of students who have overcome unusual adversity and/or would add to the diversity of the campus community. This award provides the equivalent of in-state tuition and general fees. The Howard Hughes Medical Institute offers support through “Mentored Research Experiences” where students receive real-world experience.

Financial Aid Statistics

Average Freshman Total Need-Based Gift Aid
$14,761

Average Undergraduate Total Need-Based Gift Aid
$15,073

Average Need-Based Loan
$4,124

Undergraduates who have borrowed through any loan program
37%

Average amount of loan debt per graduate
$26,017

Average amount of each freshman scholarship/grant package
$17,000

Financial aid provided to international students
No

Expenses per Academic Year

Tuition
Required Fees
Average Cost for Books and Supplies

Tuition / Fees Vary by Year of Study
No
Board for Commuters
Transportation for Commuters

Available Aid

Financial Aid Methodology
Federal

Scholarships and Grants

Need-Based
 

Need-Based College/University Scholarship or Grant Aid from Institutional Funds
Need-Based Federal Pell
Need-Based Private Scholarships
Need-Based SEOG
Need-Based State Scholarships

Non-Need-Based
Institutional non-need-based scholarship or grant aid is available

Federal Direct Student Loan Programs
Direct PLUS Loans
Direct Subsidized Stafford Loans
Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans

Federal Family Education Loan Programs (FFEL)
Federal Perkins Loans

Is Institutional Employment Available (other than Federal Work Study)
Yes

Direct Lender
Yes

Financial Aid Rating

Overall


Student Body Profile

Total Undergraduate Enrollment
6,301
Foreign Countries Represented
46

Demographics

8.07%
Asian
7.44%
African-American
8.82%
Hispanic
59.06%
Caucasian
6.36%
Unknown
5.67%
International

56% female
44% male
30% are out of state
99% are full time
1% are part time

Students Say

Students are quick to note that there's a generalization that the "T.W.A.M.P., or Typical William & Mary Person…is the person [who] does all their reading, shows up to class every day, and is a nerd," but most are equally quick to cast this stereotype aside. The real T.W.A.M.P., they tell us, is "open-minded, outgoing, charismatic, driven, dedicated, caring, and unique." The school is full of "well-rounded people who are in touch with their inner nerd," and "intellectual people who care about the world find the zaniest ways to have fun." "Students fit in many social circles," and students credit the close bonding that happens in freshmen dorms for this inclusivity. "You will often see the members of the football team in the library as much as any other student," and "everyone is involved with at least one other thing outside of class, and often…about ten other things." "Students are an eclectic bunch united by our thirst for knowledge and overwhelming Tribe Pride."

Overview


Campus Life

Undergrads living on campus
74%
Help finding off-campus housing
Yes

First-Year Students living on campus
100%

Campus Environment
Village

Housing Options

Apartment Single
Disabled Student
Dorms Coed
Frat Sorority
International Student
Other
Theme Housing

Students Say

When students describe campus life at W&M, the word community comes up—a lot. And this community "is made up of incredibly involved, dedicated, and supportive students who have big dreams and big fun," who say: "We study hard, but we know how to have fun, too." Alma Mater Productions (AMP), the college programming board, "sponsors a lot of different events that are wellattended, including…comedians, music artists, movies, etc." Student organizations are also very strong, from intramural sports, some form of which "almost everyone plays," to arts organizations such as "the William & Mary Symphony Orchestra, three university choirs, the Middle Eastern Music Ensemble, an Early Music Ensemble, an Appalachian string band, a small chamber orchestra, eleven a cappella groups and…two all-student theater companies." "On the weekends, there is always a party to go to" and "the Greek community is very inclusive." Off campus, students enjoy the charms of Colonial Williamsburg, theme park Busch Gardens, Jamestown Beach on the James River, and "great outlet shopping!" Despite a few gripes about parking (which are common on a small campus), students are generally happy with their facilities, with the library and the business school receiving special mention.

Special Needs Admissions

Program / Service Name
Disability Services

Type of Program
For all students with disabilities

Director
Lisa Calligan

College Entrance Tests Required
Yes

Interview Required
No

Documentation Requred for LD
Psychological or neuropsychological report.

Documentation Requred for ADHD
Yes

Special Need Services Offered

Calculator allowed in exams
No

Dictionary allowed in exams
No

Computer allowed in exams
Yes

Spellchecker allowed in exams
No

Extended test time
Yes

Scribes
Yes

Proctors
No

Oral exams
No

Notetakers
Yes

Distraction-free environment
Yes

Accommodation for students with ADHD
No

Reading machine
Yes

Other assistive technology
Yes

Student Activities

Registered Student Organizations
475
Number of Honor Societies
19

Number of Social Sororities
13
Number of Religious Organizations
26

26% join a fraternity
34% join a sorority

Sports

Athletic Division
Division I

Men's Sports (Tribe)
11 Sports

Baseball
Basketball
Cross Country
Football
Golf
Gymnastics
Soccer
Swimming
Tennis
Track Field Indoor
Track Field Outdoor
Women's Sports (Tribe)
12 Sports

Basketball
Cross Country
Field Hockey
Golf
Gymnastics
Lacrosse
Soccer
Swimming
Tennis
Track Field Indoor
Track Field Outdoor
Volleyball

Student Services

Health
LGBT Support Groups: Safe Zone: http://wmpeople.wm.edu/site/page/safezone Counseling Center: Individual and group counseling may address identity-related issues and/or other concerns related to LGBTQ status. Outreach programs and group therapy for specific identity groups may be offered as the need arises. http://www.wm.edu/offices/wellness/counselingcenter/students/studentservices/index.php Lambda Alliance (student organization): http://wmpeople.wm.edu/site/page/lambdaalliance William & Larry (student organization): http://www.wm.edu/offices/studentleadershipdevelopment/clubsandorganizations/directory/interestgroups/williamandlarry.php Mason Alliance (student organization): http://www.wm.edu/offices/studentleadershipdevelopment/clubsandorganizations/directory/interestgroups/mason.php Center for Student Diversity: The CSD's work includes particular attention to the needs of LGBTQ students. The Center provides support and assistance with various personal concerns and institutional issues faced by LGBT students (e.g., requesting gender-neutral housing). (The CSD's website does not reflect the work the staff does with LGBT students; the site is expected to be overhauled in the not-too-distant future.) http://www.wm.edu/offices/studentdiversity/index.php W&M's Campus Pride Index rating: W&M received 3.5/5 starts on the sexual orientation scale and 3.5/5 stars on the gender identity/gender expression scale of Campus Pride's 2014 LGBT-Friendly Campus Climate Index. This page indicates the array of services and policies in place to support LGBT students. http://www.campusprideindex.org/details/premium.aspx?ID=627

Minority Support Groups: Center for Student Diversity: The CSD offers an array of programs and services for traditionally underrepresented and underserved students. http://www.wm.edu/offices/studentdiversity/index.php PLUS Program: The PLUS Program is a summer transition program intended to support students who may benefit socially and/or academically from a more gradual introduction to life at William & Mary. http://www.wm.edu/sites/plus/ Counseling Center: Individual and group counseling may address identity-related issues and/or other concerns related to minority status. Outreach programs and group therapy for specific identity groups may be offered as the need arises. http://www.wm.edu/offices/wellness/counselingcenter/

Army ROTC Offered on-campus

Sustainability

Hark the Green! At The College of William & Mary, student research and institutional initiatives toward sustainability go hand in hand. A group of physics students is designing and testing solar cells on the roof of the building that houses their department. Participants from the Student Environmental Action Coalition, the Eco-House (a dorm in which sustainability-focused students live and share their interests), and the Sharpe Community Scholars Program (which supports select first-years in academics and community engagement) recently came together to build green roof test plots. These activities are made possible by the recently initiated Student Green Fee, which aims to create a “green endowment” and to provide grants and funding for sustainability projects on campus. Part of this funding goes toward four summer research internships. Recent student summer research has resulted in an innovative in-house carbon credit program. The college’s dining services team has also recently hired three student interns to coordinate local and sustainable food initiatives and implement 100 percent composting of organic wastes. William & Mary is entirely transparent about its sustainability efforts (not surprising when it has so much to brag about); the Committee on Sustainability includes a Sustainability Fellow who regularly blogs about the school’s progress and writes press releases to let the media know about W&M’s green progress. New campus buildings are required to achieve LEED Silver or better, and Miller Hall, the new home of the business school has received LEED Gold. William & Mary is also pleased to announce a recent partnership with the Virginia Sea Grant to explore the feasibility of a community-supported fishery. In turn, this will hopefully help promote the consumption of locally harvested fish and shellfish.

School Has Formal Sustainability Committee
Yes

Sustainability-focused degree available
Yes

Public GHG inventory plan
Yes

% food budget spent on local/organic food
5%

Campus Security Report

Campus Security Report

The Jeanne Clery Act requires colleges and universities to disclose their security policies, keep a public crime log, publish an annual crime report and provide timely warnings to students and campus employees about a crime posing an immediate or ongoing threat to students and campus employees.

Please visit The Princeton Review’s page on campus safety for additional resources: http://www.princetonreview.com/safety

The Princeton Review publishes links directly to each school's Campus Security Reports where available. Applicants can also access all school-specific campus safety information using the Campus Safety and Security Data Analysis Cutting Tool provided by the Office of Postsecondary Education of the U.S. Department of Education: http://ope.ed.gov/security


Other Information

Campus-wide Internet Network
Yes

Email and Web Access Available
Yes

% of Classrooms with Wireless Internet
100

Number of Computer Labs / Classrooms
15

Average Number of PC's per Lab
18

Network Access in Dorm Rooms
Yes

Network Access in Dorm Lounges
Yes

Fee for Network Use
Yes

Student Web Pages Permitted
Yes

Student Web Pages Provided
Yes

Partnerships with Technology Companies
Yes

Online Class Registration Available
Yes

Personal computer included in tuition for each student
No

Require Undergraduates to Own Computers
Yes

Undergraduates that Own Computers
100%

Discounts Available with Hardware Vendors
Yes

Description
Apple, Dell and academic pricing

Webcasting, Digital Audio or Video-Streaming of Courses
Yes

Webcasting, Digital Audio or Video-Streaming of Campus Radio / TV Stations
No

Campus Visits Contact

Contact
Tim Wolfe
Interim Dean of Admissions

Address
Office of Admissions
P.O. Box 8795
Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795

Phone
757-221-4223

Email
admission@wm.edu

Experience College Life

Most Popular Places On Campus
Wren Building (oldest academic building)
Muscarelle Museum of Art
Lake Matoaka/College Woods
Crim Dell Bridge
Sunken Garden

Most Popular Places Off Campus
Colonial Williamsburg
Busch Gardens Amusement Park
Water Country USA
Jamestown Settlement
Outlet Shopping Centers/Pottery Factory

Campus Tours

Campus Tours
Appointment Required: Yes
Dates: Year-round
Times: Varies
Average Length: 2 hours

On Campus Interview

Campus Interviews
Yes

Information Sessions
Available

Times
10:00AM, 2:30PM

Faculty and Coach Visits

Dates/Times Available
Year-round

Arrangements
Contact Coach Directly

Advance Notice
Other

Class Visits

Dates/Times Available
Academic Year

Arrangements
Contact Admissions Office

Overnight Dorm Stays

Overnight Dorm Stays
Not Available

Arrangements
Other

Transportation

Types of Transportation Available to Campus
Several airports serve the Williamsburg area: Newport News-Williamsburg International Airport in Newport News is a 30-minute drive from campus; Norfolk International Airport in Norfolk is a 60-minute drive from campus; Byrd International Airport in Richmond is a 60-minute drive from campus. Amtrak train service is also available to Williamsburg.

Driving Instructions to Campus
From the Richmond Airport and points west: Take Interstate 64 East; Exit 234 to the right (199 East); Travel 8 miles, then turn left onto Jamestown Road for another 1.7 miles and Undergraduate Admission Office is located on right side of street. From Norfolk Airport, Newport News Airport, and other points east: Take Interstate 64 West; Use Exit 242-A (199 West); Travel 5.2 miles and turn right onto Jamestown Road for another 1.7 miles.

Local Accommodations
William & Mary is adjacent to Colonial Williamsburg. The town's restoration organization runs a number of lodging facilities, all of which are within 5 minutes of William and Mary. Colonial Williamsburg has a variety of lodging options with various price ranges (www.history.org; 1-800-HISTORY). Of these, the least expensive is the Governor's Inn (506 N. Henry St.). There are several bed-and-breakfasts near campus, which can be previewed at: www.bandbwilliamsburg.com. The closest hotel to campus is the Williamsburg Hospitality House (757-229-4020). There are many places to stay in the Williamsburg area. You can view a complete listing of lodging options from the Williamsburg Hotel and Motel Association (www.gowilliamsburg.com).