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Overview

International Business is an extension of a business program. You’ll learn about standard business practices, ethics, and economics, and you’ll generally focus on a subset of the field such as accounting, finance, or marketing. A major in International Business will lead you to use your business skills in a global context. You might learn about business transactions between and within countries; the laws and logistics of international trade; or investments made in foreign markets.


It goes without saying that knowledge of other cultures is crucial to being a successful International Businessperson. Besides your studies in business, finance, banking, and the like, you will also learn about new cultures and societies, strange laws and perspectives. You might be required to become proficient in a foreign language—even if a language isn’t required for your degree, it will certainly make you a more appealing prospective employee. If you’re successful mastering all this, you’ve got a good shot at being admitted to the jetsetter crowd.


Many universities offer internships at overseas companies, so you’ll be able to actually see what it’s like to work in a foreign business environment. Keep in mind, too, that an appreciation for travel and a compassionate world view are assets in this field.

SAMPLE CURRICULUM

  • Business Skills and Environment

  • Comparative Economic Systems

  • Comparative Management

  • Decision Theory

  • Economic Development and Growth

  • International Accounting

  • International Business Finance

  • International Economics

  • International Policy

  • International Tourism

  • Law of International Trade

  • Multinational Corporate Management

  • Multinational Marketing

  • Organizational Behavior

  • Small Business Policy

  • Statistics


HIGH SCHOOl PREPARATION

To be a successful International Business major, you should have excellent writing, reading, mathematics, and communication skills. You can develop all of these skills in high school courses such as English, history, political science, speech, and math. Also consider courses in foreign languages, any and all of them.