|
|
| | |
|
 
Please select a school type.

Grad Program: Marketing

 
Basic Information

Marketing is about more than selling products.

Marketing professionals are the link between the corporate office and the consumer. That means their responsibilities are wide-ranging: they anticipate consumer demands, help to create products and services that consumers want, attract consumers to that product or service, and retain consumers over the long haul. They also have their hand in pricing and distribution; figuring out what products should cost and how they’ll get to customers.

Right-brainers, beware: marketing is not a purely creative pursuit. Marketing grads are expected to have a strong grounding in data analysis and finance, and to back up their consumer insight with hard data. If you pursue this specialty, you’ll learn quantitative skills like pricing and survey design, as well as more qualitative skills in advertising, branding, and consumer behavior. Many schools offer electives that allow you to develop your expertise in a particular area of marketing, such as business to business, technology, or entertainment.

Grads often find careers in the marketing departments of corporations, specializing in market research, sales, or brand and product management. Others pursue jobs in the advertising or public relations industries. A marketing concentration is also useful for students considering any career where it’s necessary to understand the customer, from consulting to finance to entrepreneurship to non-profits and social causes.

Degree Information

The most common degree option is an MBA with a concentration in marketing. The MBA is typically a two-year degree, with the first year largely spent on general business and management skills. This is a great option for students who want to use marketing skills to step into broader management positions.

Some schools also offer an MS in Marketing, which has a tighter focus than the MBA (you’ll spend less time on general business courses).

The MS is also the first step towards a PhD in marketing, for students interested in academia. PhD programs take several years to complete. Doctoral students in marketing focus on one of two tracks: behavioral (consumer behavior and psychology) or quantitative (data-based analysis of marketing problems faced by companies).

Questions to Ask Yourself When Choosing a Degree Program
  • What is the career trajectory of graduates?
  • Is the program designed for those with experience in marketing, or those new to the field?
  • How specialized is the curriculum?
  • What opportunities are offered to gain hands-on marketing experience, or to network with marketing professionals?
- How specialized is the curriculum? - What opportunities are offered to gain hands-on marketing experience, or to network with marketing professionals? - What are faculty members’ areas of expertise?
If you are interested in Marketing, you might also like ...


Ask an Educational Advisor