The GRE®, GMAT®, business school and you.

If you want to apply to business school but don’t want to take the GMAT, you may be in luck. More than 1,200 MBA programs now accept the GRE General Test in lieu of the GMAT for admissions, and that means more options for you. Admissions trends are showing that business schools are looking for applicants with more than just a background and experience in business, and that means that the GMAT is not the only test in the game anymore. Before you choose which test to take, you should find out what the schools you are applying to are looking for, and from there the choice is all up to you.

What's the difference?

The GMAT and the GRE are very different tests, but they have one thing in common. No matter which test you decide to take, you'll need to prepare if you want to get a score that admissions officers can’t ignore. Once you pick the test you want to take, your next step should be to choose how you want to prep for that test. We have prep options for both the GMAT and GRE to ensure you get the best score possible.

To help you compare the differences between the tests, check out this handy chart.

GREGMAT
Why Take It The test is required for admission to most graduate schools and a growing number of business schools. The test is required for admission to most business schools.
Test Structure The GRE consists of a 60-minute Analytical Writing section - with two essays at 30 minutes each. There is a Verbal Reasoning section, also with two 30-minute parts. There are two 35-minute Quantitative Reasoning sections. There's also a 30-35 minute experimental section that can be either math or verbal. The GMAT consists of a 30-minute Analytic section with one essay, a 30-minute Integrated Reasoning section, a 75-minute Quantitative section and a 75- minute Verbal section.
Test Format Offered in paper-based and computer-adaptive by section formats. The GMAT is a computer-adaptive test.
How It's Scored Verbal and Quantitative scores from 130 to 170 in 1-point increments. The overall, or composite, GMAT score ranges from 200 to 800 in 10-point increments.
Cost $195 $250
Testing Time 3.5 hours using paper or 3.75 hours using computer 3.5 hours
How Long Are Scores Valid For? 5 years 5 years

So how do I choose?

Our goal is to help you to get into one of your top-choice business schools. We recommend you research the schools you're interested in and find out if they also accept the GRE. Click here to see the list of the 700 schools that currently accept both the GRE and the GMAT.

Which test is right for me?

The best way to determine whether the GMAT or GRE is better suited to your abilities is to get your feet wet with a practice test for each exam. Getting into business school is competitive and you don't want to take an actual GRE or GMAT sight unseen. We offer FREE full-length computer-adaptive diagnostic tests for both the GRE and the GMAT.

Start your free GRE practice test now

Start your free GMAT practice test now

How will business schools use my GRE score?

Since the GMAT and the GRE are completely different tests, comparing scores on the two is like comparing apples to oranges. ETS (the folks who administer the GRE) and GMAC (the folks who administer the GMAT) both use comparison tools to put student’s scores into perspective, but many MBA programs use the ETS comparison tool as a benchmark. To get the most out of your score and your application, you should research your chosen schools to see what score ranges they require for admission.

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