From the School

In 1873, Commodore Cornelius Vanderbilt endowed Vanderbilt University in the hope that it would "strengthen the ties which should exist between all sections of our common country." Today, Vanderbilt is a highly selective, medium-sized university with a total enrollment of 12,795. In line with the Commodore's dream, students join the campus from all over the country and around the world.

Vanderbilt has 6,835 undergraduates, and entering students are required to live on campus for four years. On-campus residence halls are shared by students in all four undergraduate schools. The university has a strong sense of community, and the housing staff works with the Vanderbilt Student Government to organize social, cultural, and educational events on campus. On-campus housing options include traditional single and double rooms, apartments, townhouses, and suites. About 42 percent of undergraduates participate in Greek life, and though fraternities and sororities do not have residential houses, Greek organizations play an active role in undergraduate life.

First-year students live on The Martha Rivers Ingram Commons, a living-learning residential community comprised of 10 residence houses, The Commons Center, and the Dean of Commons residence. A faculty member lives in each of the residence houses, serving as a mentor to students and working with elected students from the house to design programming throughout the year. The Commons Center includes dining facilities, a fitness center, post office, mini-market, and a coffee bar open 24 hours a day. Students also frequent the Sarratt Student Center which houses recreational facilities such as a movie theater, a ticket box office, a pub, student organization offices, meeting rooms, an art gallery, and facilities for the student produced radio station and newspapers. Other student facilities include a state-of-the-art recreation center with new additions that include a 120-yard indoor practice field, an 8-lane running track, expanded weight training and cardio fitness areas, and a four-lane bowling center and Warren and Moore Colleges, Vanderbilt's newest housing option for sophomores, juniors, and seniors.

Overview

Applicants
29,518
Acceptance Rate
13%
Average HS GPA
3.78

GPA Breakdown

65%
Over 3.75
20%
3.50 - 3.74
10%
3.25 - 3.49
3%
3.00 - 3.24
1%
2.50 - 2.99

Test Scores

SAT Reading
710 - 780
SAT Math
720 - 800
ACT Composite
32 - 34

Deadlines

Early Decision
November 1

Early Decision II
January 5

Regular
January 5

Other Admission Factors

Academic

Rigor of Secondary School Record
Class Rank
Academic GPA
Standardized Test Scores
Application Essay
Non-Academic

Extracurricular Activities
Character / Personal Qualities

Overall

From The School

Students apply to one of the four undergraduate schools: the College of Arts and Science, the School of Engineering, Peabody College of Education and Human Development, and the Blair School of Music. The College of Arts and Science provides all Vanderbilt students the opportunity to experience a wide range of academic disciplines and subjects. Through AXLE (Achieving eXcellence in Liberal Education), students refine their skills in writing, mathematics, foreign languages, the humanities, natural sciences, and the social sciences. The School of Engineering educates engineers for practice in industry, government, consulting, teaching, and research careers. In addition to technical courses, each student's program includes a rich complement of course work in the humanities and social sciences, resulting in a balanced foundation for future achievement and for the assumption of leadership roles in his or her chosen field. Construction of the new Engineering and Science Building will expand research opportunities, promote interdisciplinary work, and strengthen collaboration between students and faculty. The curriculum at Peabody College allows students to pursue a traditional teaching degree or to study human and organizational development, child development, child studies, or cognitive studies. All Peabody students receive a strong liberal arts foundation, combined with a solid program of pre-professional courses and a multitude of internship and practicum opportunities. Peabody undergraduates must complete requirements in communication, the humanities, mathematics, the natural sciences, and the social sciences. The Blair School offers majors in composition, musical arts, musical arts and teacher education, and performance. Instruction is available in all orchestral instruments, as well as piano, organ, euphonium, multiple woodwinds, saxophone, classical guitar, and voice. The curriculum combines intensive musical training with liberal arts studies.

Students Say

The word “balance” is much used by students in describing Vanderbilt University, whether it is the “campus mixed with city, academics mixed with social life, small population mixed with big athletics,” or the “unique balance [that] exists between social life and schoolwork.” Students say this “balance” “makes [Vanderbilt] the best place to get a well-rounded college experience.” As one student explains, “Everyone takes academics seriously, but everyone has other interests, too. No one is just a student. Everyone is involved in something.” Another student says, “At Vanderbilt, I could [pursue] my interest in music while majoring in engineering, which was not the case in most other schools.” The school is heavily influenced by the “incredible city” of Nashville. The “idyllic campus” is “only minutes away from being in the heart of the city,” where people “are very social” and “like being involved.” This correlates well with Vanderbilt students who “are very passionate about their extracurricular interests” and stay very “involved with organizations on campus and within the Nashville community. Within the more than 500 student organizations on campus, a student is hard-pressed not to find a few organizations that they can relate to.” “The professors are engaging and love their jobs, which makes the students excited and eager to learn.” Professors are “dedicated to the undergraduates” and “are always willing to meet with you outside of the classroom to discuss material from class or anything you want to. They make it clear that you are their first priority.” “In the event that the class is too big, there are TAs who are more than willing to help.” Besides the “truly enriching academic environment,” there are many “opportunities that challenge me beyond the books,” says a student. When asked about what improvements might be made to their school, many agreed, “Dining and parking are mediocre at best.” “The lines at lunch can be really long, and not as many options are open on the weekends.” Although vehicles do not seem essential to partake in Nashville and campus life, an improvement in “parking around campus” would be appreciated by students.

Faculty and Class Information

Student/Faculty
8:1
Total Faculty
1,194
with Terminal Degree


Most frequent class size
10 - 19
Most frequent lab / sub section size
10 - 19

Graduation Rates

Graduate in 4 years
94%
Graduate in 5 years
99%
Graduate in 6 years
100%


Degrees

Bachelor's
Doctoral
Doctoral/Professional
Doctoral/Research
Master's

Career Services

On-Campus Job Interviews Available
Yes

Career Services

Alumni Network
Classes
Interest Inventory
Internships
Opportunities at School

Internship

Prominent Alumni


Muhammad Yunus
2006 Nobel Peace Prize winner

Lamar Alexander
Tenn. Governor, U.S. Senator, U.S. Sec. of Educati

Roy Blount
Author and humorist

Ann S. Moore
Former President of Time, Inc., People Magazine

Fred Thompson
Former U.S. Senator and actor

Albert Gore
Former Vice President

Dr. Norman Shumway
Heart transplant pioneer

Overview

From The School

The costs for 2014-2015 include: tuition, $42,768; room and board, $14,382; books and supplies, $1,370; and the student activities and recreation fee, $1,070. First-year engineering students are required to have a laptop computer which meets requirements specified by the School of Engineering. All costs are subject to change.

Dates

Financial Aid Rating
99
Application Deadlines
Notification Date
Apr 1

Required Forms

FAFSA
Forms CSSProfile

Financial Aid Statistics

Average Freshman Total Need-Based Gift Aid
$40,331

Average Undergraduate Total Need-Based Gift Aid
$39,953

Average Need-Based Loan
$3,520

Average amount of loan debt per graduate
$20,790

Undergraduates who have borrowed through any loan program
23%

Financial aid provided to international students
Yes

Expenses per Academic Year

Tuition
$42,768
Required Fees
$1,070
Average Cost for Books and Supplies
$1,370

Tuition / Fees Vary by Year of Study
Yes
Board for Commuters
Transportation for Commuters

Available Aid

Financial Aid Methodoloy
Federal and Institutional

Scholarships and Grants
Need-Based College/University Scholarship or Grant Aid from Institutional Funds
Need-Based Federal Pell
Need-Based Private Scholarships
Need-Based SEOG
Need-Based State Scholarships

Federal Direct Student Loan Programs
Direct PLUS Loans
Direct Subsidized Stafford Loans
Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans

Federal Family Education Loan Programs (FFEL)
College/university loans from institutional funds
Federal Nursing Loans
Federal Perkins Loans

Is Institutional Employment Available (other than Federal Work Study)
Yes

Direct Lender
Yes

Overall

From The School

Vanderbilt Student Government is responsible for maintaining a lively educational atmosphere on campus. Elected representatives of VSG work in conjunction with the over 510 student-run organizations to bring noted speakers and events to campus. Students can join a variety of pre-professional, cultural, religious, political, and social organizations. Vanderbilt's Honor Code has governed the undergraduate academic experience since the first final examination in 1875. Every year, one senior has the honor of serving a four-year term as the Young Alumni Trustee of the university's Board of Trust. Vanderbilt has a thriving college athletics program. A founding member of the SEC, Vanderbilt sponsors 16 Division I (FBS) teams. In 2014, the Vanderbilt Baseball team won the NCAA National Championship. Since 2000, Vanderbilt has claimed 19 individual and team SEC championships. Vanderbilt athletes succeed on and off the field: the school's teams achieve the highest graduation rate in the SEC and one of the top rates in the country.

Students Say

At Vanderbilt, “students hail from all over America and the world, but they all embrace the Southern spirit.” A typical student is described as “extremely social,” as well as “naturally very bright and motivated.” Students stress the “atmosphere of individual achievement instead of competition. The students are academic…but at the same time they are not ’showy’ about it.” The main stereotype of a Vanderbilt student still is “preppy, wealthy, upper-class,” and “involved in Greek life” is changing. “Geographic diversity has certainly expanded in the past ten years.” “Students come from all over and the freshman experience does a good job making us a united class.”

Student Body Profile

Total Undergraduate Enrollment
6,851
Out of State
89%

International
7%
Foreign Countries Represented
49

Demographics

10.75%
Asian
8.61%
African-American
8.58%
Hispanic
62.16%
Caucasian
4.33%
Unknown
6.67%
International

50% female
50% male
89% are out of state
99% are full time
1% are part time

Overview

From The School

Vanderbilt is located in the city of Nashville, home to a diverse population of 1.7 million and marked by a special touch of Southern charm. As the capital of Tennessee, Nashville is an important cultural and commercial hub in the mid-South, and is often referred to as Music City. Located equidistant from the northern and southern U.S. borders, Nashville sits at the intersection of three major interstate highways, and the international airport is served by all major airlines. Beyond the city limits, the surrounding area contains 81 parks and recreation areas, and over 30,000 acres of lakes, offering ample opportunity for sports year round.

Students Say

“While courses are challenging and demanding, the environment is also fun.” Students profess, “School comes first, but having a good time is a close second.” “The social life is extremely fun and inclusive.” “Greek life is large” here. For many freshman and sophomores, social life “revolves around frat parties.” “Older students will go to parties at their friend’s place and then go downtown to continue the night.” One student explains, “There is [a] Greek scene at the school that offers one kind of Vanderbilt experience, then there are a whole lot of independents who have a different experience. Both groups seem to really enjoy their time here and interact frequently, but the experiences are different.” “The campus is beautiful” and “the people—staff, students, professors—are warm and welcoming.” “There are always free events going on around campus including everything from casino night, to free movies, to parties, to philanthropy events. There is never a lack of opportunities for fun on campus. On the weekends, people like to use our meal plan to eat off campus and ride our bus downtown to experience Nashville life.” “There are so many unique local bars within walking distance!” On the whole, “people here are happy. I feel like I am either partying or doing homework, but it’s a good mix.”

Campus Life

Undergrads living on campus
95%
Help finding off-campus housing
Yes

Quality of life rating
99
First-Year Students living on campus
100%

Campus Environment
Large Urban
Fire safety rating
97

Housing Options

Apartment Single
Disabled Student
Dorms Coed
Dorms Female
Dorms Male
Frat Sorority
Other
Theme Housing

Special Needs Admissions

Program / Service Name
Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, and Disability Services Department

Type of Program
For all students with disabilities

College Entrance Tests Required
No

Interview Required
No

Documentation Requred for LD
Students requesting accommodation on the basis of a specific learning disability must provide documentation performed and signed by a professional who has undergone comprehensive training and has relevant experience in differential diagnosis of a full range of cognitive and psychiatric disabilities (e.g., licensed clinical psychologists, educational psychologists and neuropsychologists). This documentation must include, but is not restricted to, the following: o A Diagnostic Interview: A diagnostic interview including a description of the presenting problem(s); relevant developmental, medical, psycho-social and employment histories; family history (including primary language of the home and the student's current level of English fluency); and a discussion of co-morbidity where indicated. o An Assessment: A Neuropsychological or a psychoeducational evaluation is required. It must include the current impact of the disorder on the individual's ability to function in an academic setting and have been administered within the past five years. Such data should include subtest and standard scores. Identifying a discrepancy between or among test scores is not sufficient to warrant the diagnosis of a learning disability or establish eligibility for accommodation. Evidence must establish a clear link between specific deficit areas and the functional limitations experienced by the individual. o For the evaluation to illustrate a substantial limitation to learning, the comprehensive assessment battery must assess the following domains: �� (A) Aptitude/Cognitive Ability �� (B) Academic Achievement �� (C) Information Processing o Clinical Summary: The clinical summary must indicate a specific Learning Disability diagnosis per the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV (DSM-IV), the substantial limitations to major life activities posed by the specified learning disability, description of the extent to which these limitations impact the academic context for which accommodations are being requested, suggestions how the specific effects of the learning disability may be accommodated, and a clear statement of how the effects of the learning disability can be mediated by the recommended accommodations. o Currency: To establish the need for accommodation, documentation must reflect the current impact of the learning disability. In general, this means testing should have been conducted within the past three years for a high school student and within the past five years for an adult. Assessments used for Adolescents and Adults with Learning Disabilities: Psychoeducational and neuropsychological testing include tests that measure: o Aptitude o Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale – III (WAIS-III) o Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Battery – Revised; Tests of Cognitive Ability o Kaufman Adolescent and Adult Intelligence Test (KAIT) o Academic Achievement o Scholastic Abilities Test for Adults o Stanford Test of Academic Skills o Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Battery – Revised: Tests of Achievement o Wechsler Individual Achievement Test (WIAT) �� Or specific achievement tests such as: Vanderbilt University - Learning Disability Documentation Guidelines • Nelson-Denny Reading Skills Test • Stanford Diagnostic Mathematics Test • Test of Written Language – 3 (TOWL-3) • Woodcock Reading Mastery Tests – Revised o Information Processing o Detroit Tests of Learning Aptitude-3 (DTLA-3) o Information from subtests on WAIS-R or Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Battery- Revised: Tests of Cognitive Ability, as well as other relevant instruments o Behavior through Rating Scales (that are used in conjunction with other tests listed above). Rating scales include: o Wender Utah Rating Scale o Brown Attention-Activation Disorder Scale o Beck Anxiety Inventory o Hamilton’s Depression Rating Scale o Conners Teacher Rating Scale (ages 3-17) o Conners Parent Rating Scale (ages 3-17) Copies of an Individual Educational Plan (IEP) or a 504 Plan alone are not acceptable documentation. Prior accommodations in an educational setting do not necessarily warrant the provision of current accommodations.

Documentation Requred for ADHD
Students requesting accommodations on the basis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) must provide documentation performed and signed by a professional who has undergone comprehensive training and has relevant experience in differential diagnosis and the full range of psychiatric disorders (e.g., licensed clinical psychologist, neuropsychologist, psychiatrist and other relevantly trained medical doctors). The documentation must include, but is not restricted to, the following: o An Assessment: A Neuropsychological or a psychoeducational evaluation is required. It must have been administered within the past three years. The evaluation must provide clear and specific evidence that a disability exists and that alternative explanations for lower than expected performance have been ruled out. The assessment, and any resulting diagnosis, must consist of and be based on multiple forms of evidence (i.e., standardized test results, informal assessment results, observational and historical data). Evidence must establish a clear link between specific deficit areas and the functional limitations experienced by the individual. o For the evaluation to illustrate a substantial limitation to learning, the comprehensive assessment battery must assess the following domains: �� Aptitude/Cognitive Ability �� Academic Achievement �� Information Processing o A diagnostic interview: The interview must contain a self-report and third-party information pertaining to developmental history, family history of ADHD or other learning or psychological difficulties, relevant medical and medication history, a thorough academic history, and/or a review of prior psychoeducational test reports to determine whether a pattern of strengths or weaknesses is supportive of attention or learning problems. o Evidence of early impairment: The condition must have been exhibited in childhood in more than one setting. o Evidence of current impairment: An assessment of the presenting attentional symptoms and evidence of current impulsive/hyperactive or inattentive behaviors that significantly impair functioning in two or more settings. In an academic setting, functional impairment is most often expressed in poor academic performance across a variety of academic tasks. In adults, work history may demonstrate an inability to retain or maintain employment. o Evidence of alternative diagnoses or explanations being ruled out: The documentation must investigate and discuss the possibility of dual diagnoses and alternative or coexisting mood, behavioral, neurological and/or personality disorders that may confound the ADHD diagnosis. o A specific psychological diagnosis as per the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual - IV (DSMIV): Symptoms of hyperactivity/impulsivity that were present in childhood, and the current symptoms which have been present for at least the past six months and which impair functioning in two or more settings (e.g., school, work, home) must also be identified. o Effects of Medication: An indication of whether or not the student was evaluated while on medication and the degree to which the prescribed treatment reduces the level or degree of impairment. o A clinical summary: Details indicating the substantial limitations of the major life activities posed by the disability, describing the extent to which these limitations would impact the academic context for which accommodations are being requested, suggests how the specific effects of the disability may be accommodated, and states how the effects of ADHD are mediated by the recommended accommodations. Vanderbilt University - ADHD Documentation Guidelines 2 Assessments used for Adolescents and Adults with ADHD Psychoeducational and neuropsychological testing include tests that measure: o Aptitude o Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale – III (WAIS-III) o Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Battery – Revised; Tests of Cognitive Ability o Kaufman Adolescent and Adult Intelligence Test (KAIT) o Academic Achievement o Scholastic Abilities Test for Adults o Stanford Test of Academic Skills o Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Battery – Revised: Tests of Achievement o Wechsler Individual Achievement Test (WIAT) �� Or specific achievement tests such as: • Nelson-Denny Reading Skills Test • Stanford Diagnostic Mathematics Test • Test of Written Language – 3 (TOWL-3) • Woodcock Reading Mastery Tests – Revised o Information Processing o Detroit Tests of Learning Aptitude-3 (DTLA-3) o Information from subtests on WAIS-R or Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Battery – Revised: Tests of Cognitive Ability, as well as other relevant instruments o Behavior through Rating Scales (that are used in conjunction with other tests listed above). Rating scales include: o Wender Utah Rating Scale o Brown Attention-Activation Disorder Scale o Beck Anxiety Inventory o Hamilton’s Depression Rating Scale o Conners Teacher Rating Scale (ages 3-17) o Conners Parent Rating Scale (ages 3-17) Copies of an Individual Educational Plan (IEP) or a 504 Plan alone are not acceptable documentation. Prior accommodations

Special Need Services Offered

Calculator allowed in exams
Yes

Dictionary allowed in exams
Yes

Computer allowed in exams
Yes

Spellchecker allowed in exams
Yes

Extended test time
Yes

Scribes
Yes

Proctors
Yes

Oral exams
Yes

Notetakers
Yes

Distraction-free environment
Yes

Accommodation for students with ADHD
No

Reading machine
No

Other assistive technology
Yes

Student Activities

Registered Student Organizations
510
Number of Honor Societies
16

Number of Social Sororities
16
Number of Religious Organizations
25

32% join a fraternity
54% join a sorority

Sports

Athletic Division
Division I

Men's Sports (Commodores)
6 Sports

Baseball
Basketball
Cross Country
Football
Golf
Tennis
Women's Sports (Commodores)
9 Sports

Basketball
Bowling
Cross Country
Golf
Lacrosse
Soccer
Swimming
Tennis
Track Field Outdoor

Student Services

Day Care
Health
Womens Center
LGBT Support Groups
Minority Support Groups
Army ROTC Offered on-campus
Navy ROTC Offered on-campus
Air Force ROTC Offered at cooperating institutions: Tennessee State University

Sustainability

Vanderbilt University was named after a railroad tycoon, and its sustainability movement might as well be a train. It’s swift moving—Vanderbilt University has already developed a comprehensive Environmental Commitment Statement. It has many moving parts—Vanderbilt’s Plant Operations and Vanderbilt Environmental Health and Safety collaborate to form the Sustainability and Environmental Management Office (SEMO), whose mission is to initiate, promote, coordinate, evaluate and encourage environmental management and sustainability initiatives that improve Vanderbilt’s impact on the community and environment, while simultaneously providing sustainability and environmental management services for the entire institution. And it’s going to be hard to stop—leaders of the future are being cultivated and groomed through the university’s several active student-run sustainability groups on campus; including SPEAR (Students Promoting Environmental Awareness and Responsibility), Alternative Energy Club (Biodiesel), and the Vanderbilt Initiative for Vegetarian Awareness (VIVA); as well as several environmental research centers and myriad courses related to sustainability and the environment. The campus itself is also laying a sturdy green foundation; Vanderbilt was the first university in Tennessee to have any LEED-certified buildings, and claims one of the largest collections of LEED-certified facilities in the Southeast, composed of two LEED Certified projects, five LEED Silver, and seven LEED Gold. With all the enormous undertakings going on at Vanderbilt, those at this Tennessean university still never lose sight of the little things that make an impact; students and community can take their pick from various recycling and commuter choice programs.

Green Rating
97
School Has Formal Sustainability Committee
Yes

Sustainability-focused degree available
Yes

School employs a sustainability officer
Yes

Public GHG inventory plan
Yes

% food budget spent on local/organic food
15%

Available Transportation Alternatives

Bike Share
Yes

Car Sharing Program
Yes

Carpool/Vanpool Matching Program
Yes

Cash-Out Parking
Yes

Condensed Work Week Option For Employees
Yes

Incentives Or Programs To Encourage Employees To Live Close To Campus
Yes

Indoor And Secure Bike Storage, Shower Facilities, And Lockers For Bicycle Commuters
Yes

Reduced Parking Fees For Car And Van Poolers
Yes

School Adopted A Policy Prohibiting Idling
Yes

School Developed Bicycle Plan
Yes

School Offers A Telecommute Program For Employees
Yes
Data provided by Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE), STARS®, as of February, 2014.

Campus Security Report

Campus Security Report

The Jeanne Clery Act requires colleges and universities to disclose their security policies, keep a public crime log, publish an annual crime report and provide timely warnings to students and campus employees about a crime posing an immediate or ongoing threat to students and campus employees.

Please visit The Princeton Review’s page on campus safety for additional resources: http://www.princetonreview.com/safety

The Princeton Review publishes links directly to each school's Campus Security Reports where available. Applicants can also access all school-specific campus safety information using the Campus Safety and Security Data Analysis Cutting Tool provided by the Office of Postsecondary Education of the U.S. Department of Education: http://ope.ed.gov/security


Other Information

Campus-wide Internet Network
Yes

Email and Web Access Available
Yes

% of Classrooms with Wireless Internet
100

Number of Computer Labs / Classrooms
11

Average Number of PC's per Lab
29

Network Access in Dorm Rooms
Yes

Network Access in Dorm Lounges
Yes

Fee for Network Use
No

Student Web Pages Permitted
Yes

Student Web Pages Provided
Yes

Partnerships with Technology Companies
No

Online Class Registration Available
Yes

Personal computer included in tuition for each student
No

Require Undergraduates to Own Computers
No

Discounts Available with Hardware Vendors
No

Webcasting, Digital Audio or Video-Streaming of Campus Radio / TV Stations
Yes

Campus Visits Contact

Address
Office of Undergraduate Admissions
2305 West End Av
Nashville, TN 37203

Phone
6153222561

Email
admissions@vanderbilt.edu

Experience College Life

Most Popular Places On Campus
The Commons
Jean and Alexander Heard Library
Student Recreation Center
Student Life Center
Sarratt Student Center

Most Popular Places Off Campus
2nd Avenue/Lower Broadway - Historic/Entertainment District
Grand Ole Opry; The Ryman; Schermerhorn Symphony Center
Titans Football; Predators Ice Hockey
Percy Priest Lake; Cheekwood Botanical Garden
The Parthenon; Frist Center for Visual Arts

Campus Tours

Campus Visiting Center
Monday-Friday; Saturday mornings during
8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
6153222561

Campus Tours
Appointment Required: Yes
Dates: Year-round
Times: 10:00 a.m.; 1:00 p.m.; 2:30 p.m.
Average Length: 2 hours

On Campus Interview

Campus Interviews
No

Information Sessions
Not Available

Times

Faculty and Coach Visits

Dates/Times Available
Year-round

Arrangements
Contact Athletic Department

Advance Notice
Other

Contact Email Address for Visit
andrew.turner@vanderbilt.edu

Class Visits

Dates/Times Available
Academic Year

Arrangements
Contact Admissions Office

Overnight Dorm Stays

Overnight Dorm Stays
Available

Arrangements
Contact Admissions Office

Limitations
1-night stay only for seniors

Transportation

Types of Transportation Available to Campus
Nashville International Airport is approximately 10 miles from campus and taxis and rental cars are available. Capitol Limousines also provides service to Vanderbilt and area hotels with a call prior to your arrival (615-883-6777). Greyhound buses serve Nashville, and taxis to campus are available at the bus station.

Driving Instructions to Campus
From the north, take I-65 to I-40 E.; from I-40 take Exit 209B. Turn right on Broadway (U.S. 70 S.). Follow Broadway and veer right to West End Ave. Continue on West End to 23 Ave. Undergraduate Admissions is located on the right. From the east or south, take I-40 W. to Exit 209A. Turn left on Broadway and follow preceding directions from there. From the west, take I-40 E. to Exit 209B. Turn right on Broadway and follow preceding directions from there.

Local Accommodations
Several choices are within walking distance of the university. The most expensive (the special rate for university visitors is at the high end of the moderate range) is Loews Vanderbilt Hotel (2100 West End Ave.; 615-320-1700, or 800-336-3335) which is across the street from campus. At the Hampton Inn (1919 West End Ave.; 615-329-1144 or 800-426-7866), you can get a cheap double room. Rates are a bit higher at the Holiday Inn Vanderbilt (2613 West End Ave.; 615-327-4707 or 800-663-4427), which has a pool and fitness room. We like the all-suite Hermitage Hotel (231 6th Ave. North; 615-244-3121 or 800-251-1908), about a 5-minute drive from the university. Built in 1910, the hotel has been beautifully restored, but rates are expensive. The new Homewood Suites (2400 West End; 615-340-8000) has an indoor pool and fitness center.