Students Say

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the East Coast mecca of engineering, science, and mathematics, “is the ultimate place for information overload, endless possibilities, and expanding your horizons.” The “amazing collection of creative minds” includes enough Nobel laureates to fill a jury box as well as brilliant students who are given substantial control of their educations; one explains, “The administration’s attitude toward students is one of respect. As soon as you come on campus, you are bombarded with choices.” Students need to be able to manage a workload that “definitely push[es you] beyond your comfort level.”

Overview

Applicants
18,356
Acceptance Rate
8%

Test Scores

SAT Reading
680 - 770
SAT Math
740 - 800
SAT Writing
690 - 780
ACT Composite
33 - 35

Deadlines


Regular
January 1

Other Admission Factors

Non-Academic

Character / Personal Qualities

Overall

Students Say

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the East Coast mecca of engineering, science, and mathematics, “is the ultimate place for information overload, endless possibilities, and expanding your horizons.” The “amazing collection of creative minds” includes enough Nobel laureates to fill a jury box as well as brilliant students who are given substantial control of their educations; one explains, “The administration’s attitude toward students is one of respect. As soon as you come on campus, you are bombarded with choices.” Students need to be able to manage a workload that “definitely push[es you] beyond your comfort level.” A chemical engineering major elaborates: “MIT is different from many schools in that its goal is not to teach you specific facts in each subject. MIT teaches you how to think, not about opinions but about problem solving. Facts and memorization are useless unless you know how to approach a tough problem.” Professors here range from “excellent teachers who make lectures fun and exciting” to “dull and soporific” ones, but most “make a serious effort to make the material they teach interesting by throwing in jokes and cool demonstrations.” “Access to an amazing number of resources, both academic and recreational,” “research opportunities for undergrads with some of the nation’s leading professors,” and a rock-solid alumni network complete the picture. If you ask “MIT alumni where they went to college, most will immediately stick out their hand and show you their ‘brass rat’ (the MIT ring, the second most recognized ring in the world).”

Faculty and Class Information

Student/Faculty
8:1
Total Faculty
1,504
with Terminal Degree
1,325

1,107
Men
397
Women
238
Minority
67
International

Most frequent class size
2 - 9
Most frequent lab / sub section size
10 - 19

Graduation Rates

Graduate in 4 years
81%
Graduate in 5 years
89%
Graduate in 6 years
91%

Majors

  • Architecture and Related Service

  • Architecture
  • City/Urban, Community and Regional Planning

  • Biological and Biomedical Sciences

  • Biology/Biological Sciences, General
  • Computational Biology
  • Neuroscience

  • Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services

  • Business/Commerce, General

  • Communication, Journalism, and Related Programs

  • Mass Communication/Media Studies

  • Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services

  • Computer Science

  • Engineering

  • Aerospace, Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering
  • Biomedical/Medical Engineering
  • Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
  • Chemical Engineering
  • Civil Engineering, General
  • Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering
  • Environmental/Environmental Health Engineering
  • Materials Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Nuclear Engineering

  • English Language and Literature/Letters

  • Creative Writing
  • English Language and Literature, General

  • Foreign languages, literatures, and Linguistics

  • Foreign Languages and Literatures, General
  • Linguistics

  • History

  • History, General

  • Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Studies and Humanities

  • Liberal Arts and Sciences/Liberal Studies

  • Mathematics and Statistics

  • Mathematics, General

  • Multi/Interdisciplinary Studies

  • Cognitive Science
  • Mathematics and Computer Science
  • Science, Technology and Society

  • Philosophy and Religious Studies

  • Philosophy

  • Physical Sciences

  • Chemistry, General
  • Geology/Earth Science, General
  • Physics, General

  • Social Sciences

  • Anthropology
  • Economics, General
  • Political Science and Government, General

  • Visual and Performing Arts

  • Music, General


Degrees

Bachelor's
Doctoral/Research
Master's

Career Services

On-Campus Job Interviews Available
Yes

Career Services

Alumni Network
Alumni Services
Classes
Interest Inventory
Internships
Regional Alumni
Opportunities at School

Coop
Experiential
Internship

Prominent Alumni


Capt. Catherine (Cady) Coleman '83
astronaut

Helen Greiner ‘89
inventor and co-founder, iRobot

H. Robert Horvitz '68
Nobel Laureate, Physiology/Medicine

Shirley Ann Jackson '68
Physicist and President, Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst

I.M. Pei '40
architect

Carlos Prieto '58
cellist

Thomas Massie '93
Congressman

Dates

Financial Aid Rating
92
Application Deadlines
Feb 15
Notification Date
Apr 1

Required Forms

Business Farm Supp
FAFSA
Forms CSSProfile
Forms Divorced Parent

Bottom Line

For the fall and spring terms, MIT tuition is about $44,720. Room and board averages about $13,224per academic year, though those costs vary depending on a student’s living situation. Books run about $1,000. MIT admits students without regard to their familys’ circumstances and awards financial aid to students solely on the basis of need. The school is very clear that its sticker price not scare away applicants; approximately 76 percent of undergrads receive some form of aid. They also try to limit the amount of aid provided in loan form, aiming to meet the first $6,000 of need with loans or on-campus work, and covering the remainder of a student’s demonstrated need with a scholarship.

Bang For Your Buck

Aid from all sources totals more than $115.6 million, and 72 percent of that total is provided by MIT Scholarships. Sixty-two percent of undergraduates qualify for need-based MIT Scholarships, and the average scholarship award exceeds $32,000. MIT is one of only a few number of institutions that have remained wholly committed to needblind admissions and need-based aid. (There are no purely merit-based scholarships.) What truly sets MIT apart, however, is the percentage of students from lower-income households. Twenty-eight percent of MIT undergraduates are from families earning less than $75,000 a year, and 19 percent qualify for a federal Pell Grant. MIT also educates a high proportion of first-generation college students, including 16 percent of the current freshman class.

Financial Aid Statistics

Average Freshman Total Need-Based Gift Aid
$36,881

Average Undergraduate Total Need-Based Gift Aid
$37,090

Average Need-Based Loan
$3,005

Average amount of loan debt per graduate
$19,064

Undergraduates who have borrowed through any loan program
37%

Average amount of each freshman scholarship/grant package
$33,062

Financial aid provided to international students
Yes

Expenses per Academic Year

Tuition
$44,720
Required Fees
$296
Average Cost for Books and Supplies
$1,000

Tuition / Fees Vary by Year of Study
No
Board for Commuters
Transportation for Commuters

Available Aid

Financial Aid Methodoloy
Institutional

Scholarships and Grants

Need-Based
 

Need-Based College/University Scholarship or Grant Aid from Institutional Funds
Need-Based Federal Pell
Need-Based Private Scholarships
Need-Based SEOG
Need-Based State Scholarships

Federal Direct Student Loan Programs
Direct PLUS Loans
Direct Subsidized Stafford Loans
Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans

Federal Family Education Loan Programs (FFEL)
College/university loans from institutional funds
Federal Perkins Loans

Is Institutional Employment Available (other than Federal Work Study)
Yes

Direct Lender
Yes

Overall

Students Say

“There actually isn’t one typical student at MIT,” students here assure us, explaining that “hobbies range from building robots and hacking to getting wasted and partying every weekend. The one thing students all have in common is that they are insanely smart and love to learn. Pretty much anyone can find the perfect group of friends to hang out with at MIT.” “Most students do have some form of ’nerdiness’” (like telling nerdy jokes, being an avid fan of Star Wars, etc.), but “Contrary to MIT’s stereotype, most MIT students are not geeks who study all the time and have no social skills. The majority of the students here are actually quite ’normal.’” The “stereotypical student [who] looks techy and unkempt…only represents about 25 percent of the school.” The rest include “multiple-sport standouts, political activists, fraternity and sorority members, hippies, clean-cut business types, LARPers, hackers, musicians, and artisans. There are people who look like they stepped out of an Abercrombie & Fitch catalog and people who dress in all black and carry flashlights and multi-tools. Not everyone relates to everyone else, but most people get along, and it’s almost a guarantee that you’ll fit in somewhere.

Student Body Profile

Total Undergraduate Enrollment
4,512
Out of State
91%

International
12%
Foreign Countries Represented
91

Demographics

27.22%
Asian
6.21%
African-American
17.85%
Hispanic
40.74%
Caucasian
1.98%
Unknown
11.52%
International

46% female
54% male
91% are out of state
99% are full time
1% are part time

Overview

Students Say

At MIT, “It may seem…like there’s no life outside problem sets and studying for exams,” but “there’s always time for extracurricular activities or just relaxing” for those “with good time-management skills” or the “ability to survive on [a] lack of sleep.” Options range from “building rides” (recent projects have included a motorized couch and a human-sized hamster wheel) “to partying at fraternities to enjoying the largest collection of science fiction novels in the United States at the MIT Science Fiction Library.” Students occasionally find time to “pull a hack,” which is an ethical prank, “like the life-size Wright brothers’ plane that appeared on top of the Great Dome for the one-hundredth anniversary of flight.” Undergrads tell us, “MIT has great parties—a lot of Wellesley, Harvard, and BU students come to them,” but also that “there are tons of things to do other than party” here. “Movies, shopping, museums, and plays are all possible with our location near Boston. There are great restaurants only [blocks] away from campus, too…From what I can tell, MIT students have way more fun on the weekends than their Cambridge counterparts [at] Harvard.”

Campus Life

Undergrads living on campus
87%
Help finding off-campus housing
Yes

Quality of life rating
74
First-Year Students living on campus
100%

Campus Environment
Small Urban
Fire safety rating
88

Housing Options

Apartment Married
Cooperative
Disabled Student
Dorms Coed
Dorms Female
Frat Sorority
Other
Theme Housing
Wellness Housing

Special Needs Admissions


College Entrance Tests Required
No

Interview Required
No

Special Need Services Offered


Student Activities

Registered Student Organizations
450
Number of Honor Societies
10

Number of Social Sororities
6
Number of Religious Organizations
27

50% join a fraternity
32% join a sorority

Sports

Athletic Division
Division III

89% participate in intramural sports
20% participate in intercollegiate sports

Men's Sports (Engineers)
18 Sports

Baseball
Basketball
Crew Rowing
Cross Country
Diving
Fencing
Football
Lacrosse
Riflery
Sailing
Soccer
Squash
Swimming
Tennis
Track Field Indoor
Track Field Outdoor
Volleyball
Water Polo
Women's Sports (Engineers)
16 Sports

Basketball
Crew Rowing
Cross Country
Diving
Fencing
Field Hockey
Lacrosse
Riflery
Sailing
Soccer
Softball
Swimming
Tennis
Track Field Indoor
Track Field Outdoor
Volleyball

Student Services

Day Care
Health
LGBT Support Groups
Minority Support Groups
Army ROTC Offered on-campus
Navy ROTC Offered on-campus
Air Force ROTC Offered on-campus

Sustainability

The MIT Office of Sustainability connects researchers, decision-makers, and implementers across MIT to develop a deeper understanding of the challenges of campus sustainability and the cutting edge solutions to address them. The Office of Sustainability and others help to raise awareness and provide engagement opportunities for action around sustainable practices and environmental stewardship with stellar results: MIT’s waste-diversion rate is 47 percent, and recent building demolition projects have recycled 96 percent of their waste. MIT also generates much of the power it uses through the Cogeneration Plant, a 20-megawatt gas turbine that uses its own waste heat to produce power. MIT has also established “MIT Efficiency Forward,” which seeks to reduce electrical use by over 34 million kilowatt hours—about 15 percent of MIT’s current electrical use. This $14 million initiative will save more than $50 million in cost over the next ten years! A new laboratory and administration building both recently earned LEED Gold. They use 35 and 45 percent less energy, respectively, than typical buildings of similar size and purpose. Another inspiring undertaking is the MIT Energy Initiative, which “includes research, education, campus energy management and outreach activities that cover all areas of energy supply and demand, security and environmental impact.” This initiative recently funded a vast array of student energy projects, including on-campus campaigns for energy and heat conservation; design and development of a thermoelectric device, including testing its compatibility with the Cogeneration Plant; and building a demonstration solar dish concentrator and installing it on campus. With several environmentally focused student groups, top technical training, and opportunities for pioneering research, MIT is a great place to go green.

Green Rating
87
School Has Formal Sustainability Committee
Yes

Sustainability-focused degree available
Yes

School employs a sustainability officer
Yes

Public GHG inventory plan
No

% food budget spent on local/organic food
25%

Campus Security Report

Campus Security Report

The Jeanne Clery Act requires colleges and universities to disclose their security policies, keep a public crime log, publish an annual crime report and provide timely warnings to students and campus employees about a crime posing an immediate or ongoing threat to students and campus employees.

Please visit The Princeton Review’s page on campus safety for additional resources: http://www.princetonreview.com/safety

The Princeton Review publishes links directly to each school's Campus Security Reports where available. Applicants can also access all school-specific campus safety information using the Campus Safety and Security Data Analysis Cutting Tool provided by the Office of Postsecondary Education of the U.S. Department of Education: http://ope.ed.gov/security


Other Information

Campus-wide Internet Network
Yes

Email and Web Access Available
Yes

% of Classrooms with Wireless Internet
100

Number of Computer Labs / Classrooms
40

Average Number of PC's per Lab
25

Network Access in Dorm Rooms
Yes

Network Access in Dorm Lounges
Yes

Fee for Network Use
No

Student Web Pages Permitted
Yes

Student Web Pages Provided
No

Partnerships with Technology Companies
Yes

Online Class Registration Available
Yes

Personal computer included in tuition for each student
No

Require Undergraduates to Own Computers
No

Discounts Available with Hardware Vendors
Yes

Description
Dell, Apple, Sun Microsystems/Oracle, HP

Webcasting, Digital Audio or Video-Streaming of Courses
Yes

Webcasting, Digital Audio or Video-Streaming of Campus Radio / TV Stations
Yes

Campus Visits Contact

Contact
Admissions Office Staff

Address
Admissions Office, Rm. 3-108
77 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02139

Phone
617-253-3400

Email
admissions@mit.edu

Experience College Life

Most Popular Places On Campus
Ray and Maria Stata Center
Zesiger Sports and Fitness Center
Killian Court
The Infinite Corridor
The Student Center (W20)
Stata Center is a 720,000 square foot building designed by Frank Gehry. Zesiger Sports and Fitness Center is our state-of-the-art athletics facility. At 778.8 feet, the Infinite Corridor is reputed to be the longest straight hallway in the world--it connects many of the buildings on central campus and runs though two popular gathering spots: Lobby 7 and Memorial Lobby (Building 10).

Most Popular Places Off Campus
Boston Common and Public Garden
Newbury Street (shopping & eating)
Freedom Trail
North End
Fenway Park/Kenmore Square
You can tour Revolutionary History on the Freedom Trail. The North End is Boston's 'Little Italy.'

Campus Tours

Campus Visiting Center
M-F
9-5
617-253-3400

Campus Tours
Appointment Required: No
Dates: Year-round
Times: M-F 11:00 and 3:00 excluding certain holidays (see web site)
Average Length: 1 hour

On Campus Interview

Campus Interviews
No

Information Sessions
Available

Times
M-F 10am and 2pm Mid March-Mid Dec.; selected dates; check calendar online

Faculty and Coach Visits

Dates/Times Available
Year-round

Arrangements
Contact Coach Directly

Advance Notice
1 week

Class Visits

Dates/Times Available
Academic Year

Arrangements
Contact Admissions Office

Overnight Dorm Stays

Overnight Dorm Stays
Available

Arrangements
Other

Limitations
Not available during vacations. Spring visits limited to admitted students.

Transportation

Types of Transportation Available to Campus
Logan International Airport in Boston is less than 6 miles from campus. The subway (MBTA) and taxis are available for the trip from the airport to campus. Amtrak trains, Greyhound and Mass Transit buses serve Boston.

Driving Instructions to Campus
See website
Massachusetts Institute of Technology campus - Image 0
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Key Stats

18,356
Applicants
4,512
Size
8%
Acceptance Rate
1500
SAT Scores

Rankings & Lists