See what students say:

Academics

Hamilton College in upstate New York is steeped in the ideals of intellectual pursuit, allowing students to plot their course of study through an open curriculum under the guidance of an academic advisor. Critical thinking is one core skill developed, though, and that’s accomplished through classroom projects and methods like “writing a mock grant proposal for biology” or “student-led discussions where we bring in a topic … and tie it in to the theories being taught in class.” Finding topics that are personal draws is a crucial element that makes Hamilton tick, and students often “pursue interests that don’t seem traditionally compatible” on the surface. However, this allows students “to enjoy [their] major while being able to supplement [it] with other classes” of interest. “The open curriculum gives you freedom and responsibility over what and how you want to learn,” boasts one student. Others say “the ability to mix and match your interests to create your major is incredibly liberating.” Hamilton is truly “a living and learning community where learning happens outside the classroom.”

The academics at Hamilton would be nothing without professors who are “highly invested in their field and … bring that energy to their classrooms.” They “make their expectations clear,” “will challenge students to produce reasonable yet impassioned results,” and “are open to new opinions and discussions, but obviously have a plan for discussion-based classes.” Those discussions are still manageable due to Hamilton’s small class sizes—which also means “it’s almost impossible to slide under the radar.” And there are even more positives to those small classes: They “[give] you such an advantage when taking difficult classes” because students can “get one-on-one interaction during office hours or even during class.”

Student Body

Hamilton has a “quintessential small, communal, and progressive liberal arts feel” that its students seek out and adore. The “weirdly nice” group here is “predominantly white and from the northeastern area” and has “a healthy sense of irreverence.” The open curriculum tends to “attract a diverse set of interests and values among its student body,” which makes this a “perpetually stimulating environment” where “everyone wants to contribute to campus.” The social aspects of that contribution mean “everyone is looking to make friends” and is “very inclusive and welcoming.” Life here is “very balanced” and students “generally know how to take a joke and make a joke.” As one student sums it up: People here are “friendly and academic, but not cut-throat or competitive in any way.”

Campus Life

Hamilton’s campus is separated into what students call “a Light Side and a Dark Side,” and students tend to socially segregate to one or the other. “The Light Side is where the athletes and Greek life participants” can be found, and the Dark Side is where the “artsy, hipster, and alternative” students will hang out. There is “no animosity between lightsiders and darksiders, except for a few jokes here and there,” and “most of the time students utilize this dynamic to explore new classes and friends.” Opportunities for those new experiences abound here since the school features “an incredible array of student clubs and organizations”—there are “lots of activities happening all the time.” On weekends, different student clubs will typically have an all-campus event—“a dance club might have a night where they teach people how to salsa, a Harry Potter club might host a Yule Ball”—and students definitely enjoy a party, although attendance is “pretty optional.” Many students “love the outdoors and that is a huge culture here.” When the weather is favorable, students “often sit outside for meals or in Adirondack chairs scattered around campus doing work.” Those looking for things to do off campus can rest easy: Students (only those sophomore year and above are permitted to have vehicles on campus) who have cars can “go off campus to local restaurants, to see movies, or to go bowling or shopping,” whereas those without “can use the jitney [shuttle service] which drives on a loop to all of these places.”

Overview

Applicants
6,240
Acceptance Rate
21%

SAT & ACT Test Scores

SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing
25th-75th percentile
(enrolled students)
670 - 740
SAT Math
25th-75th percentile
(enrolled students)
680 - 770
ACT Composite
25th-75th percentile (enrolled students)
31 - 34

Testing Policies


ACT Writing Policy
ACT with or without Writing accepted

SAT Essay Policy
SAT with or without Writing accepted

Deadlines

Early Decision — November 15

Early Decision II — January 1

Regular — January 1


Other Admission Factors

Academic

Rigor of Secondary School Record
Class Rank
Academic GPA

Selectivity Rating


Get a personalized plan for a competitive application from an admissions expert.

Learn More

Faculty and Class Information

Student/Faculty
9:1
Total Faculty
229
with Terminal Degree
200

116
Men
113
Women
47
Minority
3
International

Most frequent class size
10 - 19
Most frequent lab / sub section size
10 - 19


Graduation Rates

Graduate in 4 years
88%
Graduate in 5 years
92%
Graduate in 6 years
93%

Majors

  • AREA, ETHNIC, CULTURAL, GENDER, AND GROUP STUDIES.

  • African-American/Black Studies.
  • American/United States Studies/Civilization.
  • Asian Studies/Civilization.
  • German Studies.
  • Russian Studies.
  • Women's Studies.

  • BIOLOGICAL AND BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES.

  • Biochemistry.
  • Biology/Biological Sciences, General.
  • Neuroscience.

  • COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCES AND SUPPORT SERVICES.

  • Computer and Information Sciences, General.

  • ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE/LETTERS.

  • Creative Writing.
  • General Literature.

  • FOREIGN LANGUAGES, LITERATURES, AND LINGUISTICS.

  • Chinese Language and Literature.
  • Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, General.
  • Foreign Languages and Literatures, General.
  • French Language and Literature.
  • Hispanic and Latin American Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, General.

  • HISTORY.

  • History, General.

  • MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS.

  • Mathematics, General.

  • MULTI/INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES.

  • Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, General.

  • NATURAL RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION.

  • Environmental Studies.

  • PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES.

  • Philosophy.
  • Religion/Religious Studies.

  • PHYSICAL SCIENCES.

  • Chemical Physics.
  • Chemistry, General.
  • Geological and Earth Sciences/Geosciences, Other.
  • Geology/Earth Science, General.
  • Physics, General.

  • PSYCHOLOGY.

  • Research and Experimental Psychology, Other.

  • PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND SOCIAL SERVICE PROFESSIONS.

  • Public Policy Analysis, General.

  • SOCIAL SCIENCES.

  • Anthropology.
  • Archeology.
  • Economics, General.
  • International Relations and Affairs.
  • Political Science and Government, General.
  • Sociology.

  • VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS.

  • Art History, Criticism and Conservation.
  • Dance, General.
  • Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, General.
  • Film/Cinema/Video Studies.
  • Fine/Studio Arts, General.
  • Music, General.


Degrees

Bachelor's

Career Services

On-Campus Job Interviews Available
Yes

Career Services

Alumni Network
Alumni Services
Classes
Interest Inventory
Internships
Regional Alumni
Opportunities at School

Experiential
Internship

Notable Faculty


Prominent Alumni


Christine Laine
Physician and Editor of the Annals of Internal Medicine

Sarah Maas
Best-Selling Author, Throne of Glass series

Bob Moses
Civil Rights Leader, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee

Mark Randolph
Co-founder, Netflix

David Solomon
President and Co-COO, Goldman-Sachs

Thomas Tull
Founding Chairman, Legendary Entertainment

Gillian Zucker
President of Business Operations, Los Angeles Clippers

Academic Rating

Graduation Rates

Graduate in 4 years
88%
Graduate in 5 years
92%
Graduate in 6 years
93%

Career Services

On-Campus Job Interviews Available
Yes

Career Services

Alumni Network
Alumni Services
Classes
Interest Inventory
Internships
Regional Alumni
Opportunities at School

Experiential
Internship

ROI & Outcomes

Information from PayScale:

Starting Median Salary (Up to Bachelor's degree completed, only)
$61,000

Mid-Career Median Salary (Up to Bachelor's degree completed, only)
$96,100

Starting Median Salary (At least Bachelor's degree)
$62,100

Mid-Career Median Salary (At least Bachelor's degree)
$105,400

Percent High Job Meaning
48%

Percent STEM
25%


Students Say

At Hamilton, there is “a real investment in ensuring that every student is successful and happy both here and after graduation.” The Career Center suggests that every student have two career related experiences before they graduate, and the Handshake career development platform helps to link students up with internships or jobs, including many that come via Hamilton alumni. There are many workshops, industry-focused programs, and employer visits held throughout the year, including the half-day Sophomore Jumpstart! for second-year students beginning their career or internship search. Peer Advisors are students who are trained to critique cover letters and resumes, and offer advice on all aspects of finding jobs through events such as the popular How I Got My Internship lunch series. A ll incoming students are assigned a dedicated career advisor to work with during their four years at Hamilton. Of the Hamilton graduates who visited PayScale.com, the average starting salary was $60,400.

Dates

Application Deadlines
Jan 15
Notification Date
Apr 1

Required Forms

FAFSA
Forms CSSProfile
Forms Divorced Parent
School

Financial Aid Statistics

Average Freshman Total Need-Based Gift Aid
$45,196

Average Undergraduate Total Need-Based Gift Aid
$43,434

Average Need-Based Loan
$4,346

Undergraduates who have borrowed through any loan program
44%

Average amount of loan debt per graduate
$20,582

Average amount of each freshman scholarship/grant package
$45,196

Financial aid provided to international students
Yes

Expenses per Academic Year

Tuition
$55,970
Required Fees
$560
Average Cost for Books and Supplies
$1,000

Tuition / Fees Vary by Year of Study
No
Board for Commuters
Transportation for Commuters

On-Campus Room and Board
$14,360
Comprehensive Fee

Available Aid

Financial Aid Methodology
Federal and Institutional

Scholarships and Grants

Need-Based
 

Need-Based College/University Scholarship or Grant Aid from Institutional Funds
Need-Based Federal Pell
Need-Based Private Scholarships
Need-Based SEOG
Need-Based State Scholarships

Federal Direct Student Loan Programs
Direct PLUS Loans
Direct Subsidized Stafford Loans
Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans

Federal Family Education Loan Programs (FFEL)
College/university loans from institutional funds
State Loans

Is Institutional Employment Available (other than Federal Work Study)
Yes

Direct Lender
No

Financial Aid Rating

Overall


Student Body Profile

Total Undergraduate Enrollment
1,915
Foreign Countries Represented
46

Demographics

7.06%
Asian
4.40%
African-American
9.58%
Hispanic
62.53%
Caucasian
5.29%
Unknown
6.59%
International

53% female
47% male
71% are out of state
100% are full time
0% are part time

Overview


Campus Life

Undergrads living on campus
100%
Help finding off-campus housing
No

First-Year Students living on campus
100%

Campus Environment
Rural

Housing Options

Apartment Married
Apartment Single
Cooperative
Disabled Student
Dorms Coed
Other
Wellness Housing

Special Needs Admissions


Director
Allen Harrison, Jr.

College Entrance Tests Required
No

Interview Required
No

Documentation Required for LD

A recent psycho-educational and/or neurological evaluation conducted by a specialist in the field.

Documentation Required for ADHD

A recent psycho-educational and/or neurological evaluation conducted by a specialist in the field.

Special Need Services Offered

Calculator allowed in exams
Yes

Computer allowed in exams
Yes

Spellchecker allowed in exams
Yes

Extended test time
Yes

Scribes
Yes

Proctors
Yes

Notetakers
Yes

Distraction-free environment
Yes

Accommodation for students with ADHD
Yes

Student Activities

Registered Student Organizations
218
Number of Honor Societies
8

Number of Social Sororities
4
Number of Religious Organizations
8

17% join a fraternity
8% join a sorority

Sports

Athletic Division
Division III

68% participate in intramural sports
34% participate in intercollegiate sports

Men's Sports (Continentals)
15 Sports

Baseball
Basketball
Crew Rowing
Cross Country
Diving
Football
Golf
Ice Hockey
Lacrosse
Soccer
Squash
Swimming
Tennis
Track Field Indoor
Track Field Outdoor
Women's Sports (Continentals)
16 Sports

Basketball
Crew Rowing
Cross Country
Diving
Field Hockey
Golf
Ice Hockey
Lacrosse
Soccer
Softball
Squash
Swimming
Tennis
Track Field Indoor
Track Field Outdoor
Volleyball

Student Services

Health
LGBT Support Groups
Minority Support Groups
Army ROTC Offered at cooperating institutions: Syracuse University
Air Force ROTC Offered at cooperating institutions: Syracuse University

Sustainability


Campus Security Report

Campus Security Report

The Jeanne Clery Act requires colleges and universities to disclose their security policies, keep a public crime log, publish an annual crime report and provide timely warnings to students and campus employees about a crime posing an immediate or ongoing threat to students and campus employees.

Please visit The Princeton Review’s page on campus safety for additional resources: http://www.princetonreview.com/safety

The Princeton Review publishes links directly to each school's Campus Security Reports where available. Applicants can also access all school-specific campus safety information using the Campus Safety and Security Data Analysis Cutting Tool provided by the Office of Postsecondary Education of the U.S. Department of Education: http://ope.ed.gov/security


Other Information

Campus-wide Internet Network
Yes

% of Classrooms with Wireless Internet
100

Fee for Network Use
No

Partnerships with Technology Companies
No

Personal computer included in tuition for each student
No

Discounts Available with Hardware Vendors
Yes

Description
Apple and Dell

Campus Visits Contact

Contact
Peaches Valdes
Dean of Admission

Address
Office of Admission
198 College Hill Rd.
Clinton, NY 13323

Phone
800-843-2655

Email
admission@hamilton.edu

Experience College Life

Most Popular Places On Campus
Kennedy Center for Theatre and the Studio Arts (2014)
Blood Fitness and Dance Center (2006)
Wellin Museum of Art (2012)
Sadove Student Center (2010)
Root Glen/Outdoor Leadership Center (2006)

Most Popular Places Off Campus
Adirondack Park/Gore Mountain
Clinton Cider Mill
Turning Stone Resort
Sangertown Mall

Campus Tours

Campus Visiting Center
Monday-Friday; Saturday
8:30am-4:30pm; 8:30am-12:30pm
800-843-2655

Campus Tours
Appointment Required: No
Dates: Year-round
Times: Varies
Average Length: 1 hour

On Campus Interview

Campus Interviews
Yes

Information Sessions
Available

Times
varies

Faculty and Coach Visits

Dates/Times Available
Year-round

Arrangements
Contact Coach Directly

Class Visits

Dates/Times Available
Academic Year

Arrangements
Contact Admissions Office

Overnight Dorm Stays

Overnight Dorm Stays
Available

Arrangements
Contact Admissions Office

Limitations
Tuesdays nights from October - mid November

Transportation

Types of Transportation Available to Campus
For those who wish to come by rail, Amtrak has daily scheduled service to Utica, where taxi service is available to Clinton. Both Greyhound and Trailways offer bus service to Utica. Air service is available to all major American cities via Syracuse, which is 45 minutes west of campus, or Albany, which is 90 minutes east of campus.

Driving Instructions to Campus
From the NY State Thruway (I-90), take Exit 32 (Westmoreland. After the toll booth, turn right, then turn left onto State Route 233 South. Proceed for 5.2 miles into Clinton (crossing Route 5). At the blinking light at the foot of a steep hill (look for the Hamilton College sign on the right), turn right up the hill onto College Hill Road. Proceed for 0.5 miles and turn right onto Campus Road. The Chet & Joy Suida House will be about 0.2 miles on your left. From the south, Follow Interstate 81 through Binghamton, New York, to New York State Route 12, exit 6 off I-81. Follow Route 12 North through the village of Waterville. After leaving Waterville on Route 12, drive approximately 9 miles to Kellogg Street. Turn left onto Kellogg Street and follow it 2.8 miles to the stop sign in the village of Clinton. Proceed straight onto College Street and continue until you reach the flashing light at the entrance to the campus. Proceed for 0.5 miles and turn right onto Campus Road. The Chet & Joy Suida House will be about 0.2 miles on your left.

Local Accommodations
On campus, the newly renovated 4th floor of the Bristol Campus Center (315-859-4271) has moderately priced rooms available. Bed and breakfasts in Clinton are Amidst The Hedges Inn (180 Sanford Avenue; 800-883-5883), Arbor Inn at Griffin House (3919 Griffin Road; 888-424-3074), The Artful Lodger (7 East Park Row; 888-563-4377), Harding Farm (3795 Harding Road; 973-493-0570) and The Welch House (67 College Street; 315-853-2911), all about one mile from campus.


Articles & Advice