From the School

As America's first research institution, Johns Hopkins University has been tackling difficult questions and providing innovative solutions since 1876. Faculty and students work side-by-side in the pursuit of discovery, continuing the university's founding mission to bring knowledge to the world.

From day one, undergrads are given the freedom to chart their own academic paths and are encouraged to explore their interests both in and outside the classroom. Students across all majors learn how to think critically, analyze problems from different angles, and view the world from a wider lens. This prepares them to innovate in any subject they pursue and make new connections across disciplines. Collaboration-with peers, mentors, and professors-is built into the academic culture at Hopkins and the campus is designed to foster work across academic boundaries. Students get to know their professors and classmates the way they would at a small liberal arts college but have all of the opportunities of a major research institution with a global reach.

Living and learning at Hopkins is multi-dimensional. The Homewood campus brings together scholars with diverse interests and cultivates a dynamic, open-minded environment. Students are engaged beyond academics as leaders, creators, and performers. With over 300 student-run organizations, from fraternities and sororities to performing arts, they find opportunities to get involved on campus and beyond.

The university looks for students who will contribute to the campus community while taking advantage of all Johns Hopkins has to offer.

Overall

From The School


Overview

Applicants
29,129
Acceptance Rate
11%
Average HS GPA
3.93

GPA Breakdown

91%
Over 3.75
7%
3.50 - 3.74
2%
3.25 - 3.49

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Test Scores

SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing
25th-75th percentile
(enrolled students)
710 - 760
SAT Math
25th-75th percentile
(enrolled students)
760 - 800
ACT Composite
25th-75th percentile (enrolled students)
33 - 35

Testing Policies


ACT Writing Policy
ACT with or without Writing accepted

SAT Essay Policy
SAT with or without Writing accepted

Deadlines

Early Decision — November 1

Regular — January 1


Other Admission Factors

Academic

Rigor of Secondary School Record
Academic GPA
Standardized Test Scores
Application Essay
Recommendation(s)
Non-Academic

Character / Personal Qualities

Selectivity Rating


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Overall

From The School



Faculty and Class Information

Student/Faculty
8:1
Total Faculty
665
with Terminal Degree
616

441
Men
224
Women
129
Minority
46
International

Most frequent class size
10 - 19
Most frequent lab / sub section size
2 - 9


Graduation Rates

Graduate in 4 years
88%
Graduate in 5 years
92%
Graduate in 6 years
94%

Majors

  • AREA, ETHNIC, CULTURAL, GENDER, AND GROUP STUDIES.

  • African-American/Black Studies.
  • East Asian Studies.
  • Near and Middle Eastern Studies.

  • BIOLOGICAL AND BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES.

  • Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Other.
  • Biology/Biological Sciences, General.
  • Biophysics.
  • Cell/Cellular and Molecular Biology.
  • Neuroscience.

  • COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCES AND SUPPORT SERVICES.

  • Computer and Information Sciences, General.

  • ENGINEERING.

  • Bioengineering and Biomedical Engineering.
  • Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering.
  • Civil Engineering, General.
  • Computer Engineering, General.
  • Electrical and Electronics Engineering
  • Engineering Mechanics.
  • Engineering, General.
  • Engineering, Other.
  • Environmental/Environmental Health Engineering.
  • Materials Engineering.
  • Mechanical Engineering.

  • ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE/LETTERS.

  • Creative Writing.
  • English Language and Literature, General.

  • FOREIGN LANGUAGES, LITERATURES, AND LINGUISTICS.

  • Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, General.
  • Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics.
  • French Language and Literature.
  • German Language and Literature.
  • Italian Language and Literature.
  • Latin Language and Literature.
  • Romance Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, General.
  • Romance Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics.
  • Spanish Language and Literature.

  • HEALTH PROFESSIONS AND RELATED PROGRAMS.

  • Public Health, General.

  • HISTORY.

  • History and Philosophy of Science and Technology.
  • History, General.

  • MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS.

  • Applied Mathematics, General.
  • Mathematics, General.

  • MULTI/INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES.

  • Behavioral Sciences.
  • Cognitive Science.
  • Human Biology.
  • Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, Other.
  • Natural Sciences.
  • Neuroscience.

  • NATURAL RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION.

  • Environmental Science.
  • Environmental Studies.

  • PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES.

  • Philosophy.

  • PHYSICAL SCIENCES.

  • Chemistry, General.
  • Geological and Earth Sciences/Geosciences, Other.
  • Geology/Earth Science, General.
  • Physics, General.

  • PSYCHOLOGY.

  • Experimental Psychology.
  • Psychology, General.

  • SOCIAL SCIENCES.

  • Anthropology.
  • Archeology.
  • Economics, General.
  • Geography.
  • International Relations and Affairs.
  • Political Science and Government, General.
  • Sociology.

  • VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS.

  • Art History, Criticism and Conservation.
  • Film/Cinema/Video Studies.


Students Say

Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore might have a rep for STEM, but undergrads say JHU offers a diversity of strong programs, including in music and political science, in which students “[can] study anything and still be taught by the highest of experts.” Students say that the academics here are “beyond compare” and rave about the interdisciplinary studies, hands-on engagement, and an “availability of resources, research, internship, and job opportunities [that] are unmatched.” With 5,300 undergrads, Hopkins is “small enough for strong interactions among students” and large enough for “unparalleled opportunities to pursue research, form strong relationships with professors, and learn from an outstanding group of peers.” While most students major in STEM fields, they “come from various backgrounds and have vastly different experiences,” and every student here is “overwhelmingly passionate about what they do and aspires to make an impact in their field.” Students have the ability to design their own curriculum, and professors “make themselves very accessible to their students for coffee chats, career advice or even just to give life advice.” Though there are a few duds in the bunch (and “some TAs sometimes don’t speak the best English”), most instructors are “more than willing to push class topics beyond the confines of the textbook to expose us to the implications of the topics discussed in class.” Students appreciate that Hopkins posts what other students think of courses so each person “can see what classes appear ‘better’ and so professors can gain feedback and improve.” Classes are “rigorous but very cooperative” and teach you “how to approach any problem fearlessly.” The strong alumni network helps with job placement, and the school “gives out a lot of money to undergrads with good ideas through the Wilson Fellowship.” Professors are eager (“almost giddy even”) to take undergraduates under their wings and show them how to do research, and these opportunities are available regardless of your major: “One of my art history major friends curated his own exhibit in a gallery downtown (with work from several world-renowned artists) as his research project,” says a student.

Degrees

Bachelor's
Certificate
Diploma
Doctoral/Research
Master's
Post-Bachelor's certificate

Career Services

On-Campus Job Interviews Available
Yes

Career Services

Alumni Network
Alumni Services
Classes
Interest Inventory
Internships
Regional Alumni
Opportunities at School

Experiential
Internship

Notable Faculty

Steven David
Professor, Political Science/International Studies

Greg Ball
Professor, Psychological and Brain Sciences/Neuroscience

Stuart (Bill) Leslie
Professor, History of Science and Technology

Alice McDermott
Professor, Writing Seminars

Jennifer Elisseeff
Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering

Prominent Alumni


Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Novelist

Wolf Blitzer
White House Correspondent, CNN

Michael Bloomberg
Mayor of NYC 2002-2013

Eva Chen
Head of Fashion Partnerships at Instagram

Aneesh Chopra
1st Chief Technology Officer of the US during the Obama administration

Terry Keenan
Economic/business columnist for the New York Post, anchor for CNN

John Wheeler
Physicist, coined the term 'black hole'

Academic Rating

Graduation Rates

Graduate in 4 years
88%
Graduate in 5 years
92%
Graduate in 6 years
94%

Career Services

On-Campus Job Interviews Available
Yes

Career Services

Alumni Network
Alumni Services
Classes
Interest Inventory
Internships
Regional Alumni
Opportunities at School

Experiential
Internship

ROI & Outcomes

Information from PayScale:

Starting Median Salary (Up to Bachelor's degree completed, only)
$65,500

Mid-Career Median Salary (Up to Bachelor's degree completed, only)
$113,200

Starting Median Salary (At least Bachelor's degree)
$68,300

Mid-Career Median Salary (At least Bachelor's degree)
$123,000

Percent High Job Meaning
57%

Percent STEM
31%


Students Say

If you asked Hopkins undergrads to summarize their career services office in one word, it would likely be “awesome.” And that's no surprise. After all, when the average starting salary for graduates is $63,200 (according to PayScale.com), you know the school is doing something right. The Career Center truly bends over backwards to help students prepare for the job market. With Career Academies in arts, media, and marketing; consulting; finance; health sciences; nonprofit and government; and STEM and innovation, the Career Center provides students with employer connections and industry specific knowledge. Impressively, undergrads can request customized workshops on any career-related topic they deem important. They can also participate in programs and internships during intersession, the university's winter semester. Locally, some popular internships are at Baltimore-based Under Armour as well as T. Rowe Price and the Baltimore Sun newspaper. In addition, undergrads can receive more traditional guidance such as resume and cover letter writing, mock interviews, and networking opportunities.

Overview

From The School



Dates

Application Deadlines
Jan 15
Notification Date
Apr 1

Required Forms

FAFSA
Forms CSSProfile
Forms Divorced Parent

Financial Aid Statistics

Average Freshman Total Need-Based Gift Aid
$44,318

Average Undergraduate Total Need-Based Gift Aid
$39,636

Average Need-Based Loan
$2,905

Undergraduates who have borrowed through any loan program
45%

Average amount of loan debt per graduate
$26,193

Financial aid provided to international students
Yes

Expenses per Academic Year

Tuition
$53,740
Required Fees
Average Cost for Books and Supplies
$1,240

Tuition / Fees Vary by Year of Study
No
Board for Commuters
Transportation for Commuters
$665

On-Campus Room and Board
$15,836
Comprehensive Fee

Available Aid

Financial Aid Methodology
Institutional

Scholarships and Grants

Need-Based
 

Need-Based College/University Scholarship or Grant Aid from Institutional Funds
Need-Based Federal Pell
Need-Based Private Scholarships
Need-Based SEOG
Need-Based State Scholarships

Non-Need-Based
Institutional non-need-based scholarship or grant aid is available

Federal Direct Student Loan Programs
Direct PLUS Loans
Direct Subsidized Stafford Loans
Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans

Federal Family Education Loan Programs (FFEL)
College/university loans from institutional funds
Federal Perkins Loans

Is Institutional Employment Available (other than Federal Work Study)
Yes

Direct Lender
No

Financial Aid Rating

Overall

From The School


Student Body Profile

Total Undergraduate Enrollment
5,374
Foreign Countries Represented
65

Demographics

26.87%
Asian
7.11%
African-American
14.67%
Hispanic
30.24%
Caucasian
5.58%
Unknown
9.63%
International

52% female
48% male
90% are out of state
99% are full time
1% are part time

Students Say

This group of “ambitious workhorses” are “very intellectually curious and smart” and “want to be on the forefront of innovation.” The typical Hopkins student “works really hard, and knows how to cut loose as well.” Though many students are interested in the sciences, everyone at Johns Hopkins “brings something unique to the school whether it is their love for art, school spirit at sporting events or their desire to find a cure for cancer.” The demographics include “a lot of international people and people from various backgrounds.” There may be “a lot of introverts,” but “people are very nice and helpful,” and everyone is “invested in the livelihood of the Hopkins community.”

Overview

From The School



Campus Life

Undergrads living on campus
51%
Help finding off-campus housing
Yes

First-Year Students living on campus
99%

Campus Environment
Large Urban

Housing Options

Apartment Single
Disabled Student
Dorms Coed
Other
Wellness Housing

Students Say

There’s a saying about the “Hopkins 500”—that “it’s the same 500 people who are social and go out to parties and bars.” In reality, “it’s probably closer to one thousand but it’s always the same people you see out,” and the library doesn’t necessarily die down just because it’s a weekend night; “some of the students prefer to study all the time.” Though life can get stressful, “most students at Hopkins are the type that thrive under pressure.” The majority of student life “revolves around clubs and organizations,” and throughout the week (as well as on weekends), students will also attend “concerts, symposiums with famous guest speakers or explore what Baltimore has to offer, such as its “a great music and food scene.” Nearby Mount Vernon “has fantastic culture and food,” and Fells Point and Federal Hill are known for their nightlife; Orioles and Ravens games are also popular. Thanks to the city’s relatively low cost of living, students “tend to go out and eat at nice restaurants without paying too much money.” During lacrosse season, some people will go the games and “get really involved in the season.”

Special Needs Admissions


Director
Dr. Terri Massie-Burrell

College Entrance Tests Required
No

Interview Required
No

Special Need Services Offered

Calculator allowed in exams
Yes

Dictionary allowed in exams
2

Computer allowed in exams
Yes

Spellchecker allowed in exams
Yes

Extended test time
Yes

Scribes
Yes

Proctors
Yes

Oral exams
Yes

Notetakers
Yes

Distraction-free environment
Yes

Other assistive technology
Yes

Student Activities

Registered Student Organizations
422
Number of Honor Societies
13

Number of Social Sororities
13
Number of Religious Organizations
16

18% join a fraternity
27% join a sorority

Sports

Athletic Division
Division III

30% participate in intramural sports
11% participate in intercollegiate sports

Men's Sports (Blue Jays)
13 Sports

Baseball
Basketball
Cross Country
Fencing
Football
Lacrosse
Soccer
Swimming
Tennis
Track Field Indoor
Track Field Outdoor
Water Polo
Wrestling
Women's Sports (Blue Jays)
11 Sports

Basketball
Cross Country
Fencing
Field Hockey
Lacrosse
Soccer
Swimming
Tennis
Track Field Indoor
Track Field Outdoor
Volleyball

Student Services

Health
LGBT Support Groups: studentaffairs.jhu.edu/lgbtq

Minority Support Groups: Office of Multicultural Student Affairs at studentaffairs.jhu.edu/oma

Army ROTC Offered on-campus
Air Force ROTC Offered at cooperating institutions: University of Maryland

Sustainability

Lauded as one of the most exceptional research universities in the nation, it’s no surprise that Johns Hopkins University has found some innovative ways to improve campus sustainability. The student group, SHIP—the Sustainable Hopkins Infrastructure Program—has helped improve building and operational efficiency in projects ranging from rain gardens to updating all campus light poles to LEDs. The Office of Sustainability hosts Green Lead, a leadership development program for freshmen, designed to expose students to the context, concepts and connections they need to be effective change agents on campus and beyond. ECO-Reps are recruited each fall to represent residence halls, and help conduct peer outreach and activities within their respective housing facilities. In fall 2013, President Daniels made JHU the 19th signatory of the Real Food Pledge: a commitment to source 20 percent of campus food locally and sustainably. Markets on campus offer a variety local, organic, fair trade, gluten free, vegan and vegetarian, and all dining facilities on Homewood campus utilize recyclable or compostable take-out materials. The university has a community-supported agriculture program on two campuses that allow students to buy fresh food from local farmers, and the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future is the birthplace of the “Meatless Monday” campaign taking shape across campuses nationwide. Johns Hopkins can also lay claim to some other notable achievements, like having the largest rooftop solar PV installation in Baltimore City and one of the largest green roofs in Maryland. The university also has a LEED silver building standard, and is home to roughly nineteen buildings throughout the institution that meet or exceed these requirements.

92/99
School Has Formal Sustainability Committee
No

Sustainability-focused degree available
Yes

School employs a sustainability officer
Yes

Public GHG inventory plan
Yes

% food budget spent on local/organic food
50%

Available Transportation Alternatives

Bike Share
Yes

Car Sharing Program
Yes

Carpool/Vanpool Matching Program
Yes

Condensed Work Week Option For Employees
Yes

Free Or Reduced Price Transit Passes And/Or Free Campus Shuttle
Yes

Incentives Or Programs To Encourage Employees To Live Close To Campus
Yes

Indoor And Secure Bike Storage, Shower Facilities, And Lockers For Bicycle Commuters
Yes

Reduced Parking Fees For Car And Van Poolers
No

School Adopted A Policy Prohibiting Idling
Yes

School Developed Bicycle Plan
No

School Offers A Telecommute Program For Employees
Yes

Campus Security Report

Campus Security Report

The Jeanne Clery Act requires colleges and universities to disclose their security policies, keep a public crime log, publish an annual crime report and provide timely warnings to students and campus employees about a crime posing an immediate or ongoing threat to students and campus employees.

Please visit The Princeton Review’s page on campus safety for additional resources: http://www.princetonreview.com/safety

The Princeton Review publishes links directly to each school's Campus Security Reports where available. Applicants can also access all school-specific campus safety information using the Campus Safety and Security Data Analysis Cutting Tool provided by the Office of Postsecondary Education of the U.S. Department of Education: http://ope.ed.gov/security


Other Information

Campus-wide Internet Network
Yes

% of Classrooms with Wireless Internet
100

Fee for Network Use
No

Partnerships with Technology Companies
Yes

Personal computer included in tuition for each student
No

Discounts Available with Hardware Vendors
Yes

Description
Apple, Dell, HP

Campus Visits Contact

Contact
Timothy Hickey-LeClair
Associate Director of Admissions

Address
Office of Undergraduate Admissions
3400 N. Charles St./Mason Hall
Baltimore, MD 21218

Phone
410-516-8171

Email
gotojhu@jhu.edu

Experience College Life

Most Popular Places On Campus
Brody Learning Commons
Gilman Hall
Undergraduate Teaching Labs
Ralph S. O'Connor Recreation Center
Fresh Food Cafe
Archaeological Museum in Gilman Hall, daVinci Robot in Hackerman Hall, Space Telescope Science Institute, Special Collections Library at Milton S. Eisenhower Library, LaB student union, JHU-MICA Film Centre, FastForwardU Homewood, Rare Books & Manuscripts Library, Bloomberg Center for Physics & Astronomy

Most Popular Places Off Campus
Baltimore Museum of Art (adjacent to the campus)
Baltimore Aquarium
Hampden neighborhood
Oriole Park at Camden Yards
Pavilions at the Inner Harbor
You can find more information about Baltimore attractions at apply.jhu.edu, hokinsinsider.com, or baltimorecollegetown.org

Campus Tours

Campus Visiting Center
Monday-Friday and selected Saturdays
8:30am-4:30pm M-F and 10am-2pm selected Saturdays
410-516-8171

Campus Tours
Appointment Required: Yes
Dates: Year-round
Times: Varies
Average Length: 1 hour

On Campus Interview

Campus Interviews
No

Information Sessions
Available

Times
Varies, see website.

Faculty and Coach Visits

Dates/Times Available
Year-round

Arrangements
Contact Coach Directly

Advance Notice
2 weeks

Contact Email Address for Visit
gotojhu@jhu.edu

Class Visits

Dates/Times Available
Academic Year

Arrangements
Check online for class availability on selected days

Overnight Dorm Stays

Overnight Dorm Stays
Available

Arrangements
Other

Limitations
1 night stay only; Online registration required; offered on selected dates

Transportation

Types of Transportation Available to Campus
By Plane: Baltimore/Washington International Airport (BWI) is 20 minutes driving time to the south of campus. Take a taxi from the airport and ask to be driven to the Homewood campus of Johns Hopkins on North Charles Street, not the hospital. By Train: Baltimore's Penn Station is 10 minutes driving time to the south of campus. Take a taxi from the station and ask to be driven to the Homewood campus of Johns Hopkins on North Charles Street, not the hospital. By Bus: The bus station is located in downtown Baltimore. Take a taxi from the station and ask to be driven to the Homewood campus of Johns Hopkins on North Charles Street, not the hospital.

Driving Instructions to Campus
Please see our website, apply.jhu.edu/directions, for the most up-to-date directions.

Local Accommodations
Double Tree Inn at the Colonnade, Radisson at Cross Keys, Mount Washington Conference Center


Articles & Advice