Overview

Applicants
13,384
Acceptance Rate
71%
Average HS GPA
3.24

GPA Breakdown

9%
Over 3.75
16%
3.50 - 3.74
22%
3.25 - 3.49
28%
3.00 - 3.24
23%
2.50 - 2.99
2%
2.00 - 2.49

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SAT Test Scores

SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing
25th-75th percentile
(enrolled students)
500 - 580
SAT Math
25th-75th percentile
(enrolled students)
490 - 570

Testing Policies


ACT Writing Policy
ACT with or without Writing accepted

Deadlines

Early Action — November 15

Regular — March 1


Other Admission Factors

Academic

Rigor of Secondary School Record
Academic GPA
Recommendation(s)

Selectivity Rating


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Faculty and Class Information

Student/Faculty
17:1
Total Faculty
1,855
with Terminal Degree
584

969
Women
886
Men
286
Minority
46
International

Most frequent class size
20 - 29
Most frequent lab / sub section size
2 - 9

Graduation Rates

Graduate in 4 years
42%
Graduate in 5 years
62%
Graduate in 6 years
65%

Majors

  • AREA, ETHNIC, CULTURAL, GENDER, AND GROUP STUDIES.

  • Women's Studies.

  • BIOLOGICAL AND BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES.

  • Biochemistry.
  • Biology/Biological Sciences, General.
  • Marine Biology and Biological Oceanography.
  • Molecular Biology.

  • BUSINESS, MANAGEMENT, MARKETING, AND RELATED SUPPORT SERVICES.

  • Accounting.
  • Business Administration and Management, General.
  • Hospitality Administration/Management, General.

  • COMMUNICATION, JOURNALISM, AND RELATED PROGRAMS.

  • Communication and Media Studies, Other.
  • Journalism.
  • Public Relations/Image Management.
  • Radio and Television.
  • Speech Communication and Rhetoric.

  • COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCES AND SUPPORT SERVICES.

  • Computer and Information Sciences, General.
  • Information Technology.

  • EDUCATION.

  • Drama and Dance Teacher Education.
  • Health Teacher Education.
  • Physical Education Teaching and Coaching.

  • ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE/LETTERS.

  • English Language and Literature, General.

  • FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES/HUMAN SCIENCES.

  • Family and Consumer Sciences/Human Sciences, General.
  • Foods, Nutrition, and Wellness Studies, General.

  • FOREIGN LANGUAGES, LITERATURES, AND LINGUISTICS.

  • Arabic Language and Literature.
  • Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, General.
  • Classics and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics.
  • French Language and Literature.
  • German Language and Literature.
  • Italian Language and Literature.
  • Latin Language and Literature.
  • Linguistics.
  • Spanish Language and Literature.

  • HEALTH PROFESSIONS AND RELATED PROGRAMS.

  • Athletic Training/Trainer.
  • Music Therapy/Therapist.
  • Public Health, General.

  • HISTORY.

  • History, General.

  • LEGAL PROFESSIONS AND STUDIES.

  • Legal Professions and Studies, Other.

  • LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES, GENERAL STUDIES AND HUMANITIES.

  • Humanities/Humanistic Studies.

  • MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS.

  • Mathematics, General.

  • MULTI/INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES.

  • Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, Other.
  • Sustainability Studies.

  • PARKS, RECREATION, LEISURE, AND FITNESS STUDIES.

  • Kinesiology and Exercise Science.

  • PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES.

  • Philosophy.
  • Religion/Religious Studies.

  • PHYSICAL SCIENCES.

  • Chemistry, General.
  • Geological and Earth Sciences/Geosciences, Other.
  • Geology/Earth Science, General.
  • Physics, General.

  • PSYCHOLOGY.

  • Psychology, General.

  • PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND SOCIAL SERVICE PROFESSIONS.

  • Youth Services/Administration.

  • SOCIAL SCIENCES.

  • Anthropology.
  • Economics, General.
  • Geography.
  • Political Science and Government, General.
  • Sociology.

  • VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS.

  • Art/Art Studies, General.
  • Cinematography and Film/Video Production.
  • Dance, General.
  • Design and Applied Arts, Other.
  • Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, General.
  • Fashion/Apparel Design.
  • Graphic Design.
  • Industrial and Product Design.
  • Music Performance, General.
  • Music, General.


Degrees

Bachelor's
Certificate
Doctoral
Doctoral/Professional
Doctoral/Research
Master's
Post-Bachelor's certificate

Career Services

On-Campus Job Interviews Available
Yes

Career Services

Alumni Network
Alumni Services
Interest Inventory
Internships
Regional Alumni
Opportunities at School

Coop
Experiential
Internship

Notable Faculty


Prominent Alumni


Angelo Cali
Founder of Mack-Cali Realty Corp

Marge Roukema
Former Congresswoman

Mike Fratello
Former NBA coach

Melba Moore
Former entertainer

E. Scott Garrett
Congressman

Lou Campanelli
Basketball Coach

Allen Ginsberg
Poet

Graduation Rates

Graduate in 4 years
42%
Graduate in 5 years
62%
Graduate in 6 years
65%

Career Services

On-Campus Job Interviews Available
Yes

Career Services

Alumni Network
Alumni Services
Interest Inventory
Internships
Regional Alumni
Opportunities at School

Coop
Experiential
Internship

ROI & Outcomes

Dates

Application Deadlines
Notification Date
Feb 15

Required Forms

FAFSA
State Aid

Financial Aid Statistics

Average Freshman Total Need-Based Gift Aid
$9,457

Average Undergraduate Total Need-Based Gift Aid
$8,536

Average Need-Based Loan
$4,229

Average amount of each freshman scholarship/grant package
$9,457

Financial aid provided to international students
Yes

Expenses per Academic Year

Tuition (In-State)
$10,808
Tuition (Out-of-State)
$18,920
Required Fees
$1,647
Average Cost for Books and Supplies
$1,300

Tuition / Fees Vary by Year of Study
No
Board for Commuters
Transportation for Commuters
$3,488

On-Campus Room and Board
$13,466
Comprehensive Fee

Available Aid

Financial Aid Methodology
Federal

Scholarships and Grants

Need-Based
 

Need-Based College/University Scholarship or Grant Aid from Institutional Funds
Need-Based Federal Pell
Need-Based Private Scholarships
Need-Based SEOG
Need-Based State Scholarships

Non-Need-Based
Institutional non-need-based scholarship or grant aid is available

Federal Direct Student Loan Programs
Direct PLUS Loans
Direct Subsidized Stafford Loans
Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans

Federal Family Education Loan Programs (FFEL)
State Loans

Is Institutional Employment Available (other than Federal Work Study)
Yes

Direct Lender
No

Overall


Student Body Profile

Total Undergraduate Enrollment
16,852
Foreign Countries Represented
106

Demographics

5.89%
Asian
12.94%
African-American
27.87%
Hispanic
41.46%
Caucasian
7.16%
Unknown
1.39%
International

61% female
39% male
89% are full time
11% are part time

Overview


Campus Life

Undergrads living on campus
30%
Help finding off-campus housing
No

First-Year Students living on campus
51%

Campus Environment
Suburban

Housing Options

Apartment Married
Apartment Single
Disabled Student
Dorms Coed
Dorms Female
International Student
Theme Housing

Special Needs Admissions

Program / Service Name
Disability Resource Center

Type of Program
For all students with disabilities

Director
Linda Smith

College Entrance Tests Required
No

Interview Required
No

Documentation Required for LD

The term learning disabilities refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by significant difficulties in the acquisition and use of listening, speaking, reading, writing, reasoning, or mathematical abilities. Adults with a diagnosis of LD must be of at least average intellectual functioning and exhibit a deficit in one or more of the following areas of neuropsychological functioning: auditory processing, visual processing, information processing speed, memory, spoken and written language skills, reading skills, mathematical skills, spatial skills, motor skills, abstract or general reasoning or executive functioning. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, individuals with learning disabilities are guaranteed certain protections and rights of equal access to programs and services. In the interest of assuring that LD documentation is appropriate to verify eligibility and to support requests for accommodations, academic adjustments and/or auxiliary aids, the following guidelines have been adopted from the Association on Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD) and established for Montclair State University. I. Qualifications of the Evaluator Professionals conducting assessments, rendering diagnoses of learning disabilities, and making recommendations for appropriate accommodations must be qualified to do so. Training and experiencing in working with an adult population is essential. The following professionals would generally be considered qualified to evaluate specific learning disabilities: trained and certified and/or licensed psychologists, educational psychologists, learning disabilities specialists (LDTCs), and other professionals. II. Documentation Testing needs to be comprehensive. It is not acceptable to administer only one test for the purpose of diagnosis. Minimally, the domains addressed must include, but are not limited to, the following: 1. Aptitude: A complete intellectual assessment with all subtests and standard scores reported. The preferred instrument is the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale III. 2. Achievement: Current levels of functioning in reading, mathematics, and written language are required. A comprehensive academic achievement battery, with all subtests and standard scores reported, is essential. The Woodcock-Johnson III is preferred. 3. Information Processing: Specific areas of information processing (e.g., short- and long-term memory, sequential memory, auditory and visual perception/processing, processing speed) should be assessed. Information from the Woodcock-Johnson III may be used to address these areas. This is not intended to be an exhaustive list or to restrict assessment in other pertinent and helpful areas, such as vocational interests and aptitudes. A complete WJ-III is also acceptable providing that it covers all of the above domains. Testing must be current. Because the provision of reasonable accommodations and services is based upon assessment of the current impact of the student’s disabilities on her/his academic performance at the postsecondary level, it is in the student’s best interest to provide recent and appropriate documentation. III. Substantiation of the Learning Disability Documentation should validate the need for services based on an individual’s current level of functioning. A comprehensive assessment battery and the resulting diagnostic report should include a diagnostic interview, assessment of aptitude, academic achievement, information processing, and a diagnosis. The evaluation must provide clear and specific evidence that a learning disability does or does not exist. Individual “learning styles” and “learning differences,” in and of themselves, do not constitute a learning disability. It is important to rule out alternative explanations for problems in learning such as emotional, attention or motivational problems that may be interfering with learning but do not constitute a learning disability. The diagnostician is expected to use direct language in the diagnosis and documentation of a learning disability, avoiding the use of terms such as “suggests” or “is indicative of.” If the data indicate that a learning disability is not present, the evaluator should state that conclusion in the report. A well-written diagnostic summary based on a comprehensive evaluation is also a necessary component of the report. The clinical summary should include: 1. A written summary of background information about the student’s educational, medical, and family histories that relate to the learning disability; 2. Demonstration that the evaluator has ruled out alternative explanations for academic problems as a result of poor education, poor motivation and/or study skills, emotional problems, attention problems, and cultural or language differences; 3. Indication of how patterns in the student’s cognitive ability, achievement and information processing reflect the presence of a learning disability; 4. Indication of the substantial limitation to learning or other major life activity presented by the learning disability and the degree to which it impacts the individual at the postsecondary level for which the accommodations are being requested; 5. Indication as to why specific accommodations are needed and how the effects of the specific disability are accommodated; and 6. An addendum of scores. The report should be printed on letterhead, signed and dated. Credentials of the evaluator should be included. IV. Recommendations for Accommodations The diagnostic report should include specific recommendations for accommodations, as well as an explanation as to why each accommodation is recommended. A description of any accommodation or auxiliary aid that has been used at the secondary or postsecondary level should be discussed. If no accommodations have been previously provided, a detailed explanation as to why none has been used and the rationale for the student’s current need for accommodations must be provided. It is important to recognize that accommodation needs can change over time and are not always identified through the initial diagnostic process. Conversely, a prior history of an accommodation does not, in and of itself, warrant the provision of a similar accommodation at the postsecondary level. Final determination for providing appropriate and reasonable accommodations rests with the institution.

Documentation Required for ADHD

Each student requesting accommodations through the Disability Resource Center is required to submit documentation to verify eligibility under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act (ADAAA). As defined by Section 504 and the ADA, an individual with a disability is a person who has a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits a major life activity, including learning. Academic adjustments and other accommodations are implemented to provide equal access to college programs and services. In order to establish eligibility as an individual with a disability, the student must submit documentation that is comprehensive, clearly specifies the presence of a disability, and is appropriate to the post-secondary setting. Any specific recommendations for accommodations must be based on significant functional limitations and must be supported by the diagnostic assessment. Accommodations and academic adjustments cannot be implemented until the student’s documentation meets these criteria. Prior history of having received an accommodation does not, in and of itself, warrant or guarantee its continued provision. An Individualized Education Plan (IEP) or 504 Plan is not sufficient documentation of a disability. Documentation for Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) must be from an appropriate professional with comprehensive training in differential diagnosis as well as direct experience working with adolescents and adults with ADD/ADHD. Professionals considered qualified to evaluate and diagnose ADD/ADHD include clinical psychologists, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, and other relevantly trained medical doctors, such as neurologists. The diagnostic report should be typed and submitted on official letterhead with name, title, professional credentials, address, and phone/fax numbers of the evaluator. The documentation must include: • A specific diagnosis of ADD or ADHD based on DSM-IV diagnostic criteria, date of the current diagnostic evaluation, and the date of the original diagnosis. • Evidence of current impairment. An assessment of the individual’s presenting symptoms and evidence of current hyperactive or inattentive behaviors that significantly impair functioning must be provided. • Relevant developmental, medical and medication history, a thorough academic history, and a review of prior psycho-educational test reports to determine whether a pattern of strengths or weaknesses is supportive of attention or learning problems should be included. • A summary of relevant assessment data that supports or refutes a diagnosis of ADD/ADHD. Diagnostic assessment must consist of more than a self-report. Possible data sources include results from the Continuous Performance Test, the T.O.V.A., Trail Making Test, or a neuropsychological evaluation. Assessments such as checklists and rating scales are valuable, but should not be used as the sole criterion for a diagnosis of ADD/ADHD. • Evidence of alternative diagnoses or explanations being ruled out. The documentation must investigate and discuss the possibility of dual diagnoses and alternative or coexisting mood, behavioral, neurological, and/or personality disorders that may confound the ADD/ADHD diagnosis. • Neurological or psycho-educational assessment may be necessary in order to determine the current impact of the disorder on the individual’s ability to function in an academic setting and to establish eligibility for classroom accommodations, including alternative testing, note-takers, etc. Such data should include subtest and standard scores. • An indication of whether or not the student was evaluated while on medication and the degree to which the prescribed treatment reduces the level or degree of impairment. • A clinical summary which: (a) indicates the substantial limitation to a major life activity posed by the disability, (b) describes the extent to which these limitations would impact the student in an academic setting, (c) suggests how the specific effects of the disability may be accommodated, and (d) states how the effects of the ADD/ADHD are mediated by the recommended accommodations.

Special Need Services Offered

Calculator allowed in exams
Yes

Dictionary allowed in exams
Yes

Computer allowed in exams
Yes

Spellchecker allowed in exams
Yes

Extended test time
Yes

Scribes
Yes

Proctors
Yes

Oral exams
Yes

Notetakers
Yes

Distraction-free environment
Yes

Accommodation for students with ADHD
Yes

Reading machine
Yes

Other assistive technology
Yes

Student Activities

Registered Student Organizations
160
Number of Honor Societies
4

Number of Social Sororities
17
Number of Religious Organizations
8

Sports

Athletic Division
Division III

Men's Sports (Red Hawks)
9 Sports

Baseball
Basketball
Diving
Football
Lacrosse
Soccer
Swimming
Track Field Indoor
Track Field Outdoor
Women's Sports (Red Hawks)
10 Sports

Basketball
Diving
Field Hockey
Lacrosse
Soccer
Softball
Swimming
Track Field Indoor
Track Field Outdoor
Volleyball

Student Services

Day Care
Health
Womens Center
LGBT Support Groups: www.montclair.edu/wellness/ssd

Minority Support Groups: /Within the Department of Earth and Environmental Studies in CSAM, there is also a program specifically geared towards minority to allow them to pursue studies and careers in science, math and engineering. “The College of Science and Mathematics will take a leadership role in the Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation (LSAMP) grant, a program funded by the National Science Foundation to increase the quality and quantity of students who successfully complete a degree in the STEM disciplines (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics)”

Sustainability

Montclair State University (MSU) became the first university in the nation to sign a Memorandum of Understanding with the Environmental Protection Agency. The agreement commits MSU to incorporating green policies and activities into all university planning and operations, including the use of green building, alternative energy, large-scale recycling, and environmental conservation. MSU also launched the PSEG Institute for Sustainability Studies, with a grant from the PSEG Foundation. The Institute helps train the next generation of scientists and decision-makers in interdisciplinary research, education, and outreach curriculum to address sustainability issues and serves as a resource for local, state, and federal agencies and the community. University Hall is already LEED-certified and all new buildings are require to seek LEED Silver. The Student Recreation Center and the John J. Cali School of Music are in the process of becoming certified. MSU instituted a campus-wide recycling program and built in mandatory use of green products into its recently awarded housekeeping contract (more than 94 percent of products used are Green Seal-certified). MSU is advancing the cause of environmental sustainability by offering the only doctoral program in environmental management in the state of New Jersey; hosting the Passaic River Institute dedicated to the clean-up and study of the Passaic River; and having the first aerobic food composter on a college campus in New Jersey. MSU also has a 100-kilowatt solar field at its New Jersey School of Conservation at Stokes State Forest and is constructing a 200-kilowatt solar field on campus that will provide electricity for a residence hall. MSU’s career guidance offers counseling for students interested in green jobs, linking students with service learning and co-op internship opportunities that incorporate a green experience.

91/99
School Has Formal Sustainability Committee
Yes

Sustainability-focused degree available
Yes

School employs a sustainability officer
Yes

Public GHG inventory plan
Yes

% food budget spent on local/organic food
21%

Available Transportation Alternatives

Bike Share
Yes

Car Sharing Program
Yes

Carpool/Vanpool Matching Program
Yes

Condensed Work Week Option For Employees
Yes

Free Or Reduced Price Transit Passes And/Or Free Campus Shuttle
Yes

Incentives Or Programs To Encourage Employees To Live Close To Campus
No

Indoor And Secure Bike Storage, Shower Facilities, And Lockers For Bicycle Commuters
Yes

Reduced Parking Fees For Car And Van Poolers
No

School Adopted A Policy Prohibiting Idling
Yes

School Developed Bicycle Plan
Yes

School Offers A Telecommute Program For Employees
No

Campus Security Report

Campus Security Report

The Jeanne Clery Act requires colleges and universities to disclose their security policies, keep a public crime log, publish an annual crime report and provide timely warnings to students and campus employees about a crime posing an immediate or ongoing threat to students and campus employees.

Please visit The Princeton Review’s page on campus safety for additional resources: http://www.princetonreview.com/safety

The Princeton Review publishes links directly to each school's Campus Security Reports where available. Applicants can also access all school-specific campus safety information using the Campus Safety and Security Data Analysis Cutting Tool provided by the Office of Postsecondary Education of the U.S. Department of Education: http://ope.ed.gov/security


Other Information

Campus-wide Internet Network
Yes

% of Classrooms with Wireless Internet
100

Fee for Network Use
No

Partnerships with Technology Companies
Yes

Personal computer included in tuition for each student
No

Discounts Available with Hardware Vendors
Yes

Description
Dell, Apple, Lenovo, HP, Toshiba

Campus Visits Contact

Contact
Fred Stolarski III
Visit Experience Coordinator

Address
1 Normal Avenue
Montclair, NJ 07042

Phone
973-655-6919

Email
stolarskifr@mail.montclair.edu

Experience College Life

Most Popular Places On Campus
Living Communities
The Heights
John J. Cali School of Music
CELS
Kasser Theater

Most Popular Places Off Campus
Hamilton House Museum
Israel Crane House
Montclair Art Museum
Lambert Castle
Iris Gardens

Campus Tours

Campus Visiting Center
Monday - Friday
M,R- 8:30-7:00/T,W,F-8:30-4:30 summer M-R 8-5:15
973-655-6919

Campus Tours
Appointment Required: Yes
Dates: Varies
Times: Varies
Average Length: 2 hours

On Campus Interview

Campus Interviews
No

Information Sessions
Available

Times
Varies

Faculty and Coach Visits

Dates/Times Available

Arrangements
Contact Athletic Department

Class Visits

Dates/Times Available

Arrangements

Overnight Dorm Stays

Overnight Dorm Stays
Available

Arrangements
Other

Limitations
Multiple registrations not allowed

Transportation

Types of Transportation Available to Campus
Shuttle bus, NJ Transit Train and Bus, Taxi Newark International Airport

Driving Instructions to Campus
Route 46 (East): Take Valley Road exit at Route 3 junction. Travel south approximately one mile to the Normal Avenue light. Turn right at the light. Route 46 (West): Take Valley Road exit immediately preceding the Route 3 junction, travel south approximately one mile to the Normal Avenue light. Turn right at the light. Route 3 (East and West): At the Route 46 junction, take the Valley Road exit south for approximately one mile to Normal Avenue. Turn right at light. Garden State Parkway North: Take Exit 153B (left lane) to Route 3 West to Valley Road, Montclair exit. Travel south one mile to Normal Avenue light. Turn right at light. Garden State Parkway South: Exit 154 to Route 46 West to Valley Road, Montclair exit. Travel south one mile to Normal Avenue light, turn right. New Jersey Turnpike North or South: Take Exit 16W to Route 3 West. Take Valley Road, Montclair exit. Travel south one mile to Normal Avenue light. Turn right at light. (Motorist traveling north on the turnpike south of Exit 11may exit there to the Garden State Parkway North.) Lincoln Tunnel: Follow to Route 3 West. Follow Route 3 directions above. George Washington Bridge. Route 80 West to Garden State Parkway South. Follow directions above.

Local Accommodations
Georgian Inn 37 N. Mountain Ave. Montclair, NJ 07042 973-746-7156 Holiday Inn Rt. 46 West, Totowa, NJ 973-785-9000 Howard Johnson 680 Rt. 3, Clifton, NJ 973-471-3800 La Quinta Inn & Suites 265 Rt. 3 East, Clifton, NJ 973-778-6500


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