From the School

UMaine: Define Tomorrow

The University of Maine (UMaine) offers extensive academic opportunities expected from a major research university, with the close-knit feel of a small college. The University of Maine is Maine’s Flagship University offering the most comprehensive academic experience in the state. There are nearly 100 majors and academic programs, 75 graduate degree programs and 30 doctoral programs. All majors benefit from a strong foundation in the liberal arts. Top students are invited to join the Honors College, one of the oldest and most prestigious honors college in the nation. UMaine is also the state’s only public research university housing facilities with international reputations for excellence. UMaine students have extraordinary opportunities to gain real-world experience through research and experiential learning. Our undergraduates have the opportunity to collaborate with faculty, conduct fieldwork, and participate in internships around the world. Wildlife ecology studies learn about animal behavior by working with wildlife biologists and baby black bears. Many engineering students secure co-ops that typically lead to employment immediately upon graduation and are global leaders in deepwater offshore wind energy research. Education majors have the opportunity to take advantage of urban, rural, and international student teaching opportunities, and our marine science students have the opportunity to spend a semester by the sea at out world renowned Darling Marine Center. There are over 200 student organizations such as SPIFFY, the student investment club that manages a $2.3 million real money portfolio, Greek Life, Division I athletics, and many more.

Overall

From The School


Overview

Applicants
12,457
Acceptance Rate
92%
Average HS GPA
3.29

GPA Breakdown

26%
Over 3.75
11%
3.50 - 3.74
11%
3.25 - 3.49
31%
3.00 - 3.24
14%
2.50 - 2.99
7%
2.00 - 2.49

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SAT & ACT Test Scores

SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing
25th-75th percentile
(enrolled students)
530 - 630
SAT Math
25th-75th percentile
(enrolled students)
520 - 620
ACT Composite
25th-75th percentile (enrolled students)
22 - 27

Testing Policies


ACT Writing Policy
ACT with or without Writing accepted

SAT Essay Policy
SAT with or without Writing accepted

Deadlines

Early Action — December 1

Regular — February 1


Other Admission Factors

Academic

Rigor of Secondary School Record
Class Rank
Academic GPA
Standardized Test Scores

Selectivity Rating


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Overall

From The School



Faculty and Class Information

Student/Faculty
15:1
Total Faculty
878
with Terminal Degree
527

463
Men
415
Women
72
Minority

Most frequent class size
10 - 19
Most frequent lab / sub section size
10 - 19


Graduation Rates

Graduate in 4 years
40%
Graduate in 5 years
57%
Graduate in 6 years
60%

Majors

  • AGRICULTURE, AGRICULTURE OPERATIONS, AND RELATED SCIENCES.

  • Agroecology and Sustainable Agriculture.
  • Animal Sciences, General.
  • Applied Horticulture/Horticulture Operations, General.
  • Food Science.

  • AREA, ETHNIC, CULTURAL, GENDER, AND GROUP STUDIES.

  • Women's Studies.

  • BIOLOGICAL AND BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES.

  • Biochemistry.
  • Biology/Biological Sciences, General.
  • Botany/Plant Biology.
  • Microbiology, General.
  • Molecular Biology.
  • Zoology/Animal Biology.

  • BUSINESS, MANAGEMENT, MARKETING, AND RELATED SUPPORT SERVICES.

  • Accounting.
  • Business Administration and Management, General.
  • Finance, General.
  • Marketing/Marketing Management, General.

  • COMMUNICATION, JOURNALISM, AND RELATED PROGRAMS.

  • Communication and Media Studies.
  • Communication, General.
  • Digital Communication and Media/Multimedia.
  • Journalism.
  • Mass Communication/Media Studies.

  • COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCES AND SUPPORT SERVICES.

  • Computer Science.

  • EDUCATION.

  • Art Teacher Education.
  • Biology Teacher Education.
  • Chemistry Teacher Education.
  • Education, General.
  • Elementary Education and Teaching.
  • English/Language Arts Teacher Education.
  • Foreign Language Teacher Education.
  • French Language Teacher Education.
  • History Teacher Education.
  • Mathematics Teacher Education.
  • Music Teacher Education.
  • Physical Education Teaching and Coaching.
  • Science Teacher Education/General Science Teacher Education.
  • Secondary Education and Teaching.
  • Social Studies Teacher Education.
  • Spanish Language Teacher Education.

  • ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES AND ENGINEERING-RELATED FIELDS.

  • Civil Engineering Technology/Technician.
  • Construction Engineering Technology/Technician.
  • Electrical, Electronic and Communications Engineering Technology/Technician.
  • Engineering Technology, General.
  • Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology/Technician.
  • Surveying Technology/Surveying.

  • ENGINEERING.

  • Bioengineering and Biomedical Engineering.
  • Chemical Engineering.
  • Civil Engineering, General.
  • Computer Engineering, General.
  • Electrical and Electronics Engineering
  • Engineering Physics/Applied Physics.
  • Engineering, General.
  • Mechanical Engineering.

  • ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE/LETTERS.

  • English Language and Literature, General.

  • FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES/HUMAN SCIENCES.

  • Human Development and Family Studies, General.

  • FOREIGN LANGUAGES, LITERATURES, AND LINGUISTICS.

  • French Language and Literature.
  • Romance Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics, Other.
  • Spanish Language and Literature.

  • HEALTH PROFESSIONS AND RELATED PROGRAMS.

  • Athletic Training/Trainer.
  • Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Technology/Technologist.
  • Communication Sciences and Disorders, General.
  • Registered Nursing/Registered Nurse.

  • HISTORY.

  • History, General.

  • LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES, GENERAL STUDIES AND HUMANITIES.

  • Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Studies and Humanities, Other.
  • Liberal Arts and Sciences/Liberal Studies.

  • MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS.

  • Mathematics, General.
  • Statistics, General.

  • MULTI/INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES.

  • Marine Sciences.
  • Multi-/Interdisciplinary Studies, Other.
  • Natural Sciences.

  • NATURAL RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION.

  • Environmental Science.
  • Forest Sciences and Biology.
  • Forestry, General.
  • Wildlife, Fish and Wildlands Science and Management.

  • PARKS, RECREATION, LEISURE, AND FITNESS STUDIES.

  • Parks, Recreation and Leisure Facilities Management, General.

  • PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES.

  • Philosophy.

  • PHYSICAL SCIENCES.

  • Chemistry, General.
  • Geology/Earth Science, General.
  • Physics, General.

  • PSYCHOLOGY.

  • Psychology, General.

  • PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND SOCIAL SERVICE PROFESSIONS.

  • Social Work.

  • SOCIAL SCIENCES.

  • Anthropology, Other.
  • Anthropology.
  • Economics, General.
  • Economics, Other.
  • International Relations and Affairs.
  • Political Science and Government, General.
  • Sociology.

  • VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS.

  • Art History, Criticism and Conservation.
  • Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, General.
  • Fine/Studio Arts, General.
  • Music Performance, General.
  • Music, General.


Students Say

Up in the Northeast corner of the United States, the University of Maine is a public research university with “all the opportunities of a large state school, while having the atmosphere of a small school.” Students in Business, Engineering, Marine Sciences, Forestry, Animal Science, Music, and Education majors all rave about their departments, but they also say that with nearly 100 majors, minors and degree programs, “the class choices are amazing.” The great value is another draw: “UMaine provides one of the most affordable university educations in the area” with “great scholarships if you have decent high school grades [and] SAT scores.” As for the classes themselves, undergrads caution that “the courses are rather challenging,” but there’s a sense of “camaraderie and willingness to … help—not just in professors but in your peers as well.” Professors are generally “passionate, helpful, and actually want to see you at their office hours,” and also bring “real-world experience into their classrooms.” Juniors and seniors advise that “building a relationship with faculty is key” to success both at UMaine and beyond as they “are eager to recruit students to help with their [own] research” and provide connections to outside jobs and research positions in their fields. Other hands-on learning opportunities abound at UMaine, with some examples including “drilling through the ice to collect sediment samples” on a frozen lake and caring for “horses and dairy cows” on the university farm. Students also find “well-established connections outside of college” in the form of hospital internships to placements at local primary schools. Because of this, students seeking “opportunity and a sense of community” find this campus to “feel like home.”

Degrees

Bachelor's
Doctoral
Doctoral/Research
Master's
Post-Bachelor's certificate
Post-Master's certificate

Career Services

On-Campus Job Interviews Available
Yes

Career Services

Alumni Network
Alumni Services
Classes
Interest Inventory
Internships
Regional Alumni
Opportunities at School

Coop
Experiential
Internship

Notable Faculty


Prominent Alumni


Stephen King
Author

Dr. Bernard Lown
Nobel Peace Prize winner

Bettina Boxall
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist

Lawrence Bender
Producer of Academy Award-winning films

Bridget Ziegelaar
NASA manager

Donald Holder
Two-time Tony Award-winning lighting designer

Pamela Ann White
U.S. Ambassador

Academic Rating

Graduation Rates

Graduate in 4 years
40%
Graduate in 5 years
57%
Graduate in 6 years
60%

Career Services

On-Campus Job Interviews Available
Yes

Career Services

Alumni Network
Alumni Services
Classes
Interest Inventory
Internships
Regional Alumni
Opportunities at School

Coop
Experiential
Internship

ROI & Outcomes

Dates

Application Deadlines
Apr 15
Notification Date
Jan 1

Required Forms

FAFSA

Financial Aid Statistics

Average Freshman Total Need-Based Gift Aid
$9,763

Average Undergraduate Total Need-Based Gift Aid
$8,866

Average Need-Based Loan
$4,159

Undergraduates who have borrowed through any loan program
78%

Average amount of loan debt per graduate
$33,890

Average amount of each freshman scholarship/grant package
$9,845

Financial aid provided to international students
Yes

Expenses per Academic Year

Tuition (In-State)
$9,000
Tuition (Out-of-State)
$29,310
Required Fees
$2,438
Average Cost for Books and Supplies
$1,000

Tuition / Fees Vary by Year of Study
No
Board for Commuters
Transportation for Commuters
$2,200

On-Campus Room and Board
$10,666
Comprehensive Fee

Available Aid

Financial Aid Methodology
Federal

Scholarships and Grants

Need-Based
 

Need-Based College/University Scholarship or Grant Aid from Institutional Funds
Need-Based Federal Pell
Need-Based Private Scholarships
Need-Based SEOG
Need-Based State Scholarships

Non-Need-Based
Institutional non-need-based scholarship or grant aid is available

Federal Direct Student Loan Programs
Direct PLUS Loans
Direct Subsidized Stafford Loans
Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans

Federal Family Education Loan Programs (FFEL)
College/university loans from institutional funds
State Loans

Is Institutional Employment Available (other than Federal Work Study)
Yes

Direct Lender
No

Financial Aid Rating

Overall

From The School


Student Body Profile

Total Undergraduate Enrollment
9,365
Foreign Countries Represented
36

Demographics

1.48%
Asian
1.96%
African-American
4.11%
Hispanic
84.45%
Caucasian
2.00%
Unknown
1.92%
International

47% female
53% male
37% are out of state
87% are full time
13% are part time

Students Say

UMaine’s “campus is filled with very welcoming people” who are “down to earth,” “helpful,” “hardworking,” and, as one undergrad phrases it, “wicked friendly.” The student body hails “mostly from the state of Maine or the surrounding New England area” and is predominantly white. Yet students emphasize that the campus is diverse, maintaining a “significant LGBT+ presence on campus” and a mix of social classes, religions, and political affiliations. Whatever the background, most students “share the love and passion of the outdoors.” Additionally, one student tells us, “Everyone has their own different quirks and no one is judged for that.” That acceptance also goes for nontraditional students. For example, the “veteran community is fantastic” and there are “many people with military partners [or] family members.” Another student sums it up: “There is a unique sense of Maine here, and we are quite united under the Black Bear banner.”

Overview

From The School



Campus Life

Undergrads living on campus
38%
Help finding off-campus housing
Yes

First-Year Students living on campus
90%

Campus Environment
Village

Housing Options

Apartment Married
Apartment Single
Disabled Student
Dorms Coed
Frat Sorority
International Student
Other
Theme Housing
Wellness Housing

Students Say

UMaine Black Bears are a very active bunch, and “sports, especially hockey, [are] a huge part of the … culture.” At games, “the student section goes crazy (in the best way)” and “the school spirit is . . . incredible.” Additionally, the school is situated in “such a unique place” that is “super green in the summer and pure white in the winter,” providing this outdoorsy student body with miles of “trails for running and biking and a river [where] people often go paddling, kayaking, swimming and fishing.” (Yes, there’s an on-campus canoe rental.) Both coastal Arcadia National Park and remote Baxter State Park, where “the Appalachian Trail ends . . . [atop] pristine Mount Katahdin,” are just an hour’s drive away. The winter season is popular for cross-country and alpine skiing, snowboarding and other sports. Other forms of physical activity are available in UMaine’s recreation center, which students boast is the “best in New England” and features “tons of equipment and … classes for people of all experience levels.” For those who would rather stay inside during the winter, the campus puts on free movies, “drag shows, trivia nights, [and] amazing Collins Center performances.” As for nightlife, while there are plenty of parties and drinking at downtown bars on weekends, there is little pressure to partake—students say their peers are “chill and accepting of whatever you do and do not do.” While the school may be in a rural environment, that doesn’t mean the students are bored or lonely. As one undergrad puts it: “When everyone’s in the middle of nowhere, no one is.”

Special Needs Admissions


Director
Sara Henry

College Entrance Tests Required
Yes

Interview Required
No

Documentation Required for LD

The campuses of the University of Maine System are committed to providing equal access to campus programs and activities to qualified persons with disabilities. A qualified individual is a person who, with or without reasonable accommodations, can meet established criteria applied to all students for participation in campus programs and activities. In order to determine if an individual is entitled to these protections the campuses of the University of Maine System require documentation that establishes the presence of a learning disability; and provides sufficient information to describe the likely impact of the learning disability on the individual’s participation in the learning process as well as other campus programs and activities. Documentation consisting only of a diagnosis, case or chart note s, and/or prescription notations is unacceptable. Copies of IEPs and Section 504 plans may be informative, but are not sufficient documentation to support accommodation. Individuals conducting evaluation and rendering diagnosis must have appropriate qualifications. Documentation typically would be provided by certified and/or licensed school psychologists, clinical psychologists, neuropsychologists, learning disability specialists, or other professionals with specific certification and experience in the identification of learning disabilities. The University has final authority for determining accommodations. This decision is based on the nature of the course or program, and specifics of the individual?s disability-related needs. Accommodations do not include interventions that are remedial or needed for personal care or study. Documentation of a Learning Disability must include: 1. Relevant Historical Information a. A summary of background information includes relevant developmental, medical and educational histories. 2. Testing a. Testing must be current, generally within the past three – four years, in order that accommodations are appropriately suited to the current impact of the disability. b. Testing must be comprehensive. It is not acceptable to a dminister only one test for the purpose of diagnosis or establishing that substantial limitation exists. Minimally, domains to be addressed must include but are not limited to: i.Aptitude, information processing, ii.Achievement: Current levels of functioning in reading, mathematics and written and oral language are required. 3. Scores a.Standard scores are required in reporting test data. Percentiles and grade equivalents are inadequate by themselves. 4.Interpretation and Diagnosis a.Test scores and other information gathered through the evaluation process should be synthesized by the evaluator and provide clear and specific evidence that a learning disability does or does not exist. Evidence of a substantial limitation to learning or other major life activity must also be provided. It is the clinician?s responsibility to make a clear diagnostic statement about the presence of a disability if it exists . 5.Recommended Accommodations a.Suggestions for appropriate auxiliary aids or services should be included. The documentation should provide a rationale substantiating the need for accommodation based on the impact of the disability. Description of accommodations and/or auxiliary aids used previously are informative, but past accommodations, especially those used in a high school environment, will not necessarily be appropriate in a university setting. Accommodations that would fundamentally alter the essential nature of a course or program will not be implemented. 6.Identifying Information a.Documentation must include the name and professional title(s) of the evaluator as well as the date(s) of testing. Reports must be typed on letterhead and signed by the evaluator. Handwritten scores or summary sheets are not acceptable.

Documentation Required for ADHD

DOCUMENTATION GUIDELINES FOR ATTENTION DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER (ADD/ADHD) The campuses of the University of Maine System are committed to providing equal access to campus programs and activities to qualified persons with disabilities. A qualified individual is a person who, with or without reasonable accommodations, can meet established criteria ap plied to all students for participation in campus programs and activities. Students requesting accommodations from the University of Maine are required to submit documentation to verify eligibility under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990(ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The eligibility requirements for disability accommodations for students with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder are: 1.Verification of diagnosis and severity of condition 2. Documentation of current significant functional limitations in an educational setting. The University has final authority for determining accommodations. This decision is based on the nature of the course or program, and specifics of the individual?s disability- related needs. Accommodations do not include interventions that are remedial or needed for personal care or study. Accommodations are provided after documentation has been submitted to and approved by Student Accessibility Services. To ensure the provision of reasonable and appropriate accommodations for students with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, or Attention Deficit Disorder the following information should be provided in the documentation. 1. Verification of Disability Professional Credentials Name, title, and professional credentials of the evaluator, including information about license or certification, area of specialization, employment, and state or province in which the individual practices. Professionals generally considered qualified to evaluate and diagnose ADHD/ADD have comprehensive training in differential diagnosis, psychiatric disorders and direct experience with adolescent or adult ADHD population, such as clinical psychologists, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists and other relevantly - trained medical doctors. b.Currency of Report The provision of reasonable accommodations and services is based upon assessment of the current impact of the disability on academic performance. In most cases, this means that a diagnostic evaluation has been completed within the last three years. Documentation older than three years may be acceptable under certain conditions on a case-by-case basis. c. Diagnostic Statement Provide a specific diagnosis of ADHD based on the DSM-V diagnostic criteria. The diagnosis must be stated directly and should not use such terms as suggests, is indicative of, or attention problems. 2. Assessment Criteria a. Evidence of Developmental or Early Impairment Include indicators establishing that symptoms of the disorder were present in childhood, or early adolescence and manifested in more than one setting b. Developmental and Medical History Include a developmental and medical history. c. DSM-V Symptoms Include a summary of objective historical information substantiating the individual?s manifestations of DSM-V ADHD throughout childhood, adolescence and adulthood (to the present) in two or more settings, and how patterns of inattentiveness, impulsivity and/or hyperactivity have been used to determine the presence of ADHD. d. Rule Out Alternative Causes Indicate that alternative psychological, medical or non cognitive (e.g.; educational; cultural) explanations have been investigated and ruled out as causes for inattentiveness, impulsivity, hyperactivity and/or executive functioning. e. Medical Treatment Provide relevant current medical history. Indicate whether or not the individual was evaluated while on medication prescribed for the treatment of ADHD, and whether or not the prescribed treatment produced a positive response 3.Educational Impact a.History of the type and degree of limitations to learning Include a summary of objective historical information about the educational impact of the ADHD from child hood to the present such as transcripts, report cards, teacher comments, tutoring evaluations, past psychoeducational testing, and other third party interviews. The individual’s history of using academic accommodations should be documented. If no history exists, then an explanation should be included regarding why accommodations were not used, and why they are now needed. b. Current educational impact Specify how ADHD currently impacts the individual?s academic functioning. Document current and substantial limitation to learning for which the individual is requesting accommodation, including how the disability impacts course examinations (if accommodations are being requested in this area). 4. Accommodation recommendations and justifications Indicate why specific accommodations are needed and how the effects of ADHD symptoms, as designated by the DSM-V, are mediated by the accommodations 5. In addition to the diagnostic report, please attach other information relevant to this student's academic adjustment.

Special Need Services Offered

Calculator allowed in exams
Yes

Dictionary allowed in exams
No

Computer allowed in exams
Yes

Spellchecker allowed in exams
Yes

Extended test time
Yes

Scribes
Yes

Proctors
Yes

Oral exams
Yes

Notetakers
Yes

Distraction-free environment
Yes

Accommodation for students with ADHD
Yes

Reading machine
Yes

Other assistive technology
Yes

Student Activities

Registered Student Organizations
160
Number of Honor Societies
7

Number of Social Sororities
9
Number of Religious Organizations
8

Sports

Athletic Division
Division I

27% participate in intramural sports
4% participate in intercollegiate sports

Men's Sports (Black Bears)
9 Sports

Baseball
Basketball
Cross Country
Diving
Football
Ice Hockey
Swimming
Track Field Indoor
Track Field Outdoor
Women's Sports (Black Bears)
10 Sports

Basketball
Cross Country
Diving
Field Hockey
Ice Hockey
Soccer
Softball
Swimming
Track Field Indoor
Track Field Outdoor

Student Services

Day Care
Health
Womens Center
LGBT Support Groups
Minority Support Groups
Army ROTC Offered on-campus
Navy ROTC Offered on-campus

Sustainability

The University of Maine has an innovative program to reduce the use of motor vehicles: It provides free bicycles to be used by faculty, staff, and students. Old or abandoned bikes are collected by the UMaine Police Department, refurbished by Maine Bound, and are then available for checkout on a monthly basis. A free shuttle also takes students from campus to downtown Orono. The result? Hundreds of UMaine students biking to class and thousands more using the shuttle to get around town, which equals thousands of fewer car trips each year. The university has a full-time Sustainability Coordinator and a Sustainability Council made up of students, faculty and staff. Under their guidance, the university has made a commitment to avoid sprawl, restore local habitats, and achieve carbon neutrality by 2040. Students have plenty of opportunities to become involved in environmental issues on campus. Eco-Reps in residence halls coordinate recycling programs and lead other environmental initiatives. UMaine’s Advanced Composting Facility converts more than 300,000 pounds of pre- and post-consumer food waste from campus dining facilities annually. By using the compost to grow greens in campus hoop houses, the university is effectively going from plate to plant and back to plate. All new buildings on campus must meet state green building standards and existing buildings are getting a makeover—two have been outfitted recently with industrial-scale solar thermal systems. Motivated students can join one of the many sustainability-based campus groups like “The Green Team,” which promotes sustainability on projects as large as national campaigns and as small as minor changes in campus life. Faculty and students research sustainable energy, including cellulosic ethanol, wind, and tidal power (with help from a $300,000 Green Loan Fund supported by the University of Maine Foundation).

91/99
AASHE STARS® rating
SILVER
School Has Formal Sustainability Committee
Yes

Sustainability-focused degree available
Yes

School employs a sustainability officer
Yes

Public GHG inventory plan
Yes

Available Transportation Alternatives

Carpool/Vanpool Matching Program
Yes

Free Or Reduced Price Transit Passes And/Or Free Campus Shuttle
Yes

Reduced Parking Fees For Car And Van Poolers
Yes

School Adopted A Policy Prohibiting Idling
Yes

School Offers A Telecommute Program For Employees
Yes
Data provided by Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE), STARS®, as of March, 2019.

Campus Security Report

Campus Security Report

The Jeanne Clery Act requires colleges and universities to disclose their security policies, keep a public crime log, publish an annual crime report and provide timely warnings to students and campus employees about a crime posing an immediate or ongoing threat to students and campus employees.

Please visit The Princeton Review’s page on campus safety for additional resources: http://www.princetonreview.com/safety

The Princeton Review publishes links directly to each school's Campus Security Reports where available. Applicants can also access all school-specific campus safety information using the Campus Safety and Security Data Analysis Cutting Tool provided by the Office of Postsecondary Education of the U.S. Department of Education: http://ope.ed.gov/security


Other Information

Campus-wide Internet Network
Yes

% of Classrooms with Wireless Internet
100

Fee for Network Use
No

Partnerships with Technology Companies
Yes

Personal computer included in tuition for each student
No

Discounts Available with Hardware Vendors
Yes

Description
https://www.umaine.edu/computerconnection/

Campus Visits Contact

Contact
Jennifer Desmond
Assistant Director of Admissions and Student Ambassador Programs

Address
Undergraduate Admissions
5713 Chadbourne Hall
Orono, ME 04469

Phone
877-486-2365

Email
umaineadmissions@maine.edu

Experience College Life

Most Popular Places On Campus
New Balance Student Recreation Center
Alfond Arena
Collins Center for the Arts
Fogler Library
The Mall (grass quad central to campus)

Most Popular Places Off Campus
Acadia National Park/Bar Harbor
Sugarloaf and Hermon Mountain - Downhill skiing
Baxter State Park/Mount Katahdin
Bangor Waterfront
Downtown Orono

Campus Tours

Campus Visiting Center
Monday - Friday (Saturday 1:00 pm)
9:30 - 3:00 pm
877-486-2365

Campus Tours
Appointment Required: Yes
Dates: Year-round
Times: Varies
Average Length: 2 hours

On Campus Interview

Campus Interviews
Yes

Information Sessions
Available

Times
Varies each semester. Check web site for dates.

Faculty and Coach Visits

Dates/Times Available
Year-round

Arrangements
Contact Coach Directly

Advance Notice
Other

Class Visits

Dates/Times Available
Varies

Arrangements
Contact Admissions Office

Overnight Dorm Stays

Overnight Dorm Stays
Not Available

Transportation

Types of Transportation Available to Campus
Bangor International Airport is 10 miles from campus. Taxis and rental cars are available at the airport. Concord Coach Lines bus service also stops on campus during the academic year. The Community Connector bus provides free shuttle service to downtown Orono every half-hour during the academic year and free service (with a MaineCard) to Bangor, Brewer, Old Town, Hampden and Orono. Rideshare options are available on and off campus.

Driving Instructions to Campus
The university is located off Exit 191 or 193 from I-95. Follow the signs to campus.

Local Accommodations
In Orono, the closest motel ? less than a mile from campus ? is the University Inn Academic Suites. University Inn is a short walk to downtown restaurants and shops. The Black Bear Inn and Conference Center is located two miles from campus. Five miles from campus, the city of Bangor has several hotels and chains: Bangor Inn and Suites, Hampton Inn, Fairfield Inn by Marriott, Hilton Garden Inn, Courtyard by Marriott, Bangor Ramada, Comfort Inn, Four Points by Sheraton, Days Inn, Howard Johnson Inn and others. For more atmosphere, the historic Charles Inn is located in downtown Bangor.


Articles & Advice