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Overview

Printmaking originally arose from a demand for multiple copies of a written or artistic work. Since then, Printmaking has developed into a fine art in itself. Printmaking is the production of original images on a separate medium, usually in multiples. Depending on the Printmaking process, an artist will draw on a surface such as a metal plate, stone, or sheet of silk, which is then treated, inked, and run with paper by hand through a press to print the desired number of original pieces.


Printmaking students study intaglio (etching and engraving), monotype lithography, serigraphy (silk screen), and relief printmaking (woodcut and linocut). Most programs, after introducing all the basic techniques, require the Printmaking major to choose one area of concentration.

SAMPLE CURRICULUM

  • Advanced Printmaking I-II

  • Art History I-II

  • Design I-II

  • Drawing I-IV

  • Introductory Intaglio

  • Introductory Lithography

  • Introductory Relief

  • Introductory Serigraphy

  • Painting

  • Sculpture

  • Studio I-IV


HIGH SCHOOl PREPARATION

If you want to major in Printmaking, you will (in most cases) need to have a portfolio of artwork in order to be admitted to a program. So, draw! Draw! Draw! Schools look for strong observational drawing skills, so draw from life as often as you can. For feedback or reviews form several schools at once, visit a National Portfolio Day. Check out local museums, community colleges, and universities for pre-college programs or seminars. Sometimes museums also offer volunteer opportunities for students.