The Princeton Review is currently experiencing some Dashboard down time. Come back again soon for an update. Sorry for the inconvenience.

Overview

Soil is, to say the least, an incredibly valuable natural resource. Don't think so? Try to grow crops without it. No problem, you say, we'll all eat meat. Okay, but where is the food for animals going to come from? The fact is that 75 percent of the planet's food and almost all of its fiber come from soil.

Soil Science is the study of the soil as a component of natural and artificial systems. If you major in it, you'll learn about the classification, physical properties, chemistry, and fertility of all kinds of soils. Along the way, you'll develop a working knowledge of ecology, microbiology, chemistry, and physics. You'll have to if you want to understand issues that are central to Soil Science, including water and air quality, landscape design, crop production, and waste management.

Once you graduate, you should find a wealth of career opportunities. Many Soil Science majors take management positions at farms and ranches, at soil and water conservation agencies, and in the area of land-use planning.

SAMPLE CURRICULUM

  • Biology

  • Chemistry

  • Crop Production

  • Crop Production in Developing Countries

  • Geology

  • Internship

  • Irrigation

  • Pesticide Chemistry

  • Plant Physiology

  • Seed Science

  • Soil Chemistry

  • Soil Classification

  • Soil Conservation

  • Soil Management

  • Soil Microbiology

  • Statistical Methods

  • Weed Science


HIGH SCHOOl PREPARATION

You don't need to know anything about Soil Science to major in it, but having an endearing love of biology and the physical sciences will help you immensely. Take all the biology and chemistry courses that your high school offers. Don't slack on math, either. Everything that you can learn about genetics, water, and plants will be helpful. Obviously, you should also learn as much as you can about the properties of different kinds of soil. Get out there. Get your hands dirty. If your high school offers agriculture courses, take a few.