The Princeton Review’s Annual Best Business School Rankings for 2019 Are Now Out

Project Names Best On-Campus MBA Programs in 18 Categories and Ranks Top 25 Online MBA Programs

NEW YORK, November 7, 2018—The Princeton Review® today released its 2019 annual ranking lists of the best business schools, saluting top MBA programs on-campus and online. Known for its college rankings in dozens of categories based on students’ ratings of their colleges, The Princeton Review tallies its nineteen categories of best business schools based largely on data from student surveys.

In all, the opinions of more than 23,000 MBA students about their business school experiences were analyzed for this project. These included surveys of 18,400 students enrolled in on-campus MBA programs at 252 business schools and of 5,100 students enrolled in online MBA programs at 75 business schools. Data from surveys of administrators at the schools was also used for some of the ranking list tallies.

The Princeton Review’s b-school ranking lists for 2019 are posted at www.princetonreview.com/best-business-schools where they are accessible for free. The company also provides information about the basis for each ranking, FAQs on the project, and detailed profiles of the schools on its website.

Among the rankings reported today: Stanford University finished #1 on four of the best “On-Campus MBA Program” lists—“Best Career Prospects,” “Best Classroom Experience,” “Best MBA for Management,” and “Best MBA for Non-Profit.” Indiana University-Bloomington landed the #1 spot on The Princeton Review’s list of “Top 25 Online MBA Programs.”

"We salute these schools for the innovative and wide range of MBA programs they offer their students,” said Robert Franek, Editor-in-Chief, The Princeton Review. “Our purpose is not to rank hundreds of b-schools hierarchically or to crown any single MBA program or school as ‘best’ overall. We compile multiple categories of ranking lists and combine them with detailed profiles of the schools to help applicants identify and successfully apply to the best MBA program for them.”

Ranking highlights and notes on The Princeton Review’s methodology for these lists follows.

Top On-Campus MBA Programs

The Princeton Review named the top eleven on-campus MBA programs for 2019 in 18 categories.  Those categories and schools ranked #1 on them are:

  • Best Career Prospects – Stanford University (CA)
  • Best Professors – University of Virginia
  • Best Classroom Experience – Stanford University (CA)
  • Most Competitive Students – Acton School of Business (TX)
  • Best Campus Environment – University of Texas at Austin
  • Best Administered – Acton School of Business (TX)
  • Greatest Resources for Women – University of Washington
  • Greatest Resources for Minority Students – Howard University (DC)
  • Most Family Friendly – Brigham Young University (UT)
  • Best Green MBA – University of Vermont
  • Toughest to Get Into – Stanford University (CA) (Note: this list is based entirely on institutional data.)

Seven categories salute schools for various MBA program specializations. One school is named for each. These categories and the top school on them are:

  • Best MBA for Consulting – University of Virginia
  • Best MBA for Finance – Columbia University (NY)
  • Best MBA for Human Resources – Brigham Young University (UT)
  • Best MBA for Management – Stanford University (CA)
  • Best MBA for Marketing – Indiana University Bloomington
  • Best MBA for Nonprofit – Stanford University (CA)
  • Best MBA for Operations – Carnegie Mellon University (PA)

Top 25 Online MBA Programs

The Princeton Review's list of top online MBA programs is a ranked list of 25 schools:

  1. Indiana University—Bloomington
  2. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  3. University of Southern California
  4. University of Florida
  5. Carnegie Mellon University (PA)
  6. IE University (Spain)
  7. Arizona State University
  8. Rochester Institute of Technology (NY)
  9. North Carolina State University
  10. Babson College (MA)
  11. University of Utah
  12. University of Texas at Dallas
  13. Auburn University (AL)
  14. Pepperdine University (CA)
  15. James Madison University (VA)
  16. Hofstra University (NY)
  17. University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  18. Strayer University (Jack Welch Management Institute) (VA)
  19. University of South Dakota
  20. University of Arizona
  21. Syracuse University (NY)
  22. The College of William and Mary (VA)
  23. The University of North Texas
  24. West Texas A&M University
  25. Old Dominion University (VA)

The Princeton Review’s website profiles of business schools report on each school’s admission requirements, academics, financial aid, campus life and career/employment information. The profiles also include five rating scores based primarily on institutional data (e.g. “Admissions Selectivity”). The company’s website also includes articles about the b-school admission exams, the GMAT ® and GRE ® , tips for crafting a stellar MBA application, and guidance for finding the program best tailored to one’s goals and circumstances.

The Princeton Review also reported today its annual lists of the best law schools for 2019. They are accessible at www.princetonreview.com/best-law-schools. The company will report its annual lists of the best undergraduate and graduate schools for entrepreneurship studies in mid-November. It will be accessible at www.princetonreview.com/entrepreneur.

About The Princeton Review’s On-Campus MBA Rankings

The Princeton Review’s tallies for its on-campus MBA ranking lists for 2019 factored in data from its surveys of business school students during the 2017-18, 2016-17, and 2015-16 school years. The survey (completed at www.princetonreview.com/student-survey) asks students about their school’s academics, student body, and campus life, and their career plans. All institutional data used to tally these ranking lists was collected in 2017-2018. The school profiles of the 252 business schools include school ratings (scores from 60-99) in five categories based primarily on institutional data. Among them are rating scores for “Admissions Selectivity” and career statistics, which factor in data on graduates’ starting salaries and employment. Further information about the methodology is at www.princetonreview.com/ranking-methodology.

About The Princeton Review’s Online MBA Top 25 Ranking List

The Princeton Review tallied its online MBA “top 25” ranking list for 2019 based on its surveys in 2017-2018 of administrators at more than 75 business schools offering online MBAs (at which a majority of their program was online), plus surveys of over 5,100 students enrolled in the schools’ online programs. Survey methodology and criteria for the ranking were based on input from business school content editors at The Princeton Review as well as an advisory board of administrators at several of the nation’s leading online MBA programs. The criteria focused on five core areas: academics, selectivity, faculty, technical platforms, and career outcomes. Data points were weighted in more than 60 unique fields to determine the final ranking. Further information about the methodology is at www.princetonreview.com/ranking-methodology.

About The Princeton Review

The Princeton Review is a leading tutoring, test prep and college admission services company. Every year, it helps millions of college- and graduate school-bound students achieve their education and career goals through online and in person courses delivered by a network of more than 4,000 teachers and tutors, online resources, and its more than 150 print and digital books published by Penguin Random House. The Princeton Review is headquartered in New York, NY. The company is not affiliated with Princeton University. For more information, visit www.PrincetonReview.com. Follow the company on Twitter  @ThePrincetonRev.

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For interviews with Princeton Review spokespersons about this project please contact Jeanne Krier.

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