Overview

Applicants
175
Acceptance Rate
95%
Average Undergrad GPA
3.20
Years Work Experience
5
Average Age
28

Test Scores

GMAT (25th and 75th percentiles)
450 - 680
GPA
2.7 - 3.95

School Type And Accreditation

School Type
Public

AACSB-approved
Yes

Selectivity Rating

Program Types

Full-Time
Yes

Part-Time
Yes

Evening
Yes

Executive
Yes

Online
Yes

Faculty Information

Student/Faculty
10:1
Total Faculty
74

96
Full-time
36
Female
4
Part-time
3
Underrepresented Minorities


Students Say

Professionalism and value are just two of the reasons an MBA degree from The University of Toledo’s College of Business and Innovation are an “immensely valuable” asset. Students can choose to begin the program in the Fall, Spring, or Summer semesters and proceed at their own pace without any formal declaration of full-time versus parttime; most people choose to work and attend classes at night, but “there is a growing group of younger MBA students who are attending full-time.” The curriculum consists of Foundation Courses (which can be waived prior to enrollment for those who earned a C or better in equivalent undergraduate courses), Core Courses, and a minimum of three electives; these specialized classes are often “only offered at one time per semester” and students do report that they can be difficult to get into. The courses “are all around the same time so there is no leaving and coming back to campus,” and for those with busy schedules or with geographic limitations, there are also opportunities to take classes online or in blended settings.

All professors are “extremely proficient and able to pass that knowledge along to their students,” and “really interested in creating a learning environment for their students.”

According to one student, “they made the decision on what aspect of business to get my degree in very hard. This is due to the fact they are all paragons of their field and make them all seem like a good career.” These individuals take a progressive pedagogical approach and help change the course experience by “encouraging research and using modern technologies,” and many of the MBA classes also “bring in external community leaders to give presentations and help prepare us to be future business leaders.” The school administration similarly “does a great job of communicating with the students about beneficial events and speakers” and works hard “to put students’ priorities first and operate as effectively and efficiently as possible.”


Concentrations

Accounting
Healthcare Administration
Human Resources
Finance
Information Systems/Information Technology
International Business
JD/MBA - Dual Degree
Leadership/Management
Marketing
MD/MBA - Dual Degree
MS/MBA - Dual Degree
Supply Chain Management

Specialized Masters

Accounting
Economics

Center for Research

Entrepeneurship
Healthcare Administration
International Business

Specialities of Faculty

Academic specialties of faculty
URL

Global Business Development Institute

Center for Family and Privately-Held Business

Edward H. Schmidt School of Professional Sales

Center for Technological Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Executive Center for Global Competitiveness (ECGC)

Business Ethics and Social Policy Program

Intermodal Transportation Institute


School of Healthcare Business Innovation and Excellence

International Trade Assistance Center

Sustainability

Courses in Sustainability
No

Sustainability course is

Description

Research Opportunities in Sustainability
No

Description

Career Overview

Accepted employment by 3 months after graduation
84%

Graduates Employed by Region

94%
Midwest
2%
Northeast
2%
West
1%
International
1%
South

Students Say

The Business Career Programs office “does an amazing job assisting MBAs with job placement if needed,” and “treat you as a professional rather than a student.” The office “works tirelessly to continually provide networking opportunities and career fairs.” As the business school is known for being “extremely strict on GPA policies, and those who don’t cut it get sent home,” the UT reputation carries weight with the region’s employers. The alumni base “creates a network that is global and more prominent than ever before,” and activities such as the Advanced Leadership Academy provide opportunities for students “to listen and interact with UT alumni on discussion panels that encompass a broad range of business issues and provide invaluable information for students to take with them.”

Recent employers of UT MBAs include Chrysler, University of Michigan Health System, First Solar, Ernst & Young, GM Powertrain, KeyBank, Heartland Information Systems, Hickory Farms, National City Corporation, Tenneco, Owens-Illinois, and Owens Corning.


Prominent Alumni

Edward Kinsey
Co-Founder, Ariba, Inc.

Ora Alleman
VP, National City Bank

Michael Durik
Executive VP, The Limited Stores, Inc.

Marvin Herb
CEO Coca-Cola Bottling Company

Julie Higgins
Exective VP, The Trust Company of Toledo

Dates


Financial Aid Statistics


Average Scholarship / Grant Aid Package
$17,646

Tuition Full-Time (per year)

Tuition (In-State)
$14,510
Tuition (Out-State)
$25,745
Fees (In-State)
$2,166
Fees (Out-State)
$2,166

Tuition Part-Time (per credit hour)

Tuition (In-State)
$537
Tuition (Out-State)
$954
Fees (In-State)
$76
Fees (Out-State)
$76

Expenses per Academic Year

Estimated Room And Board On-Campus
$0
Estimated Room And Board Off-Campus
$5,830
Academic Expenses
$1,200

Student Body Profile

Total Full-Time Enrollment
403
Part Time
74%

In State
88.0%
Out of State
12.0%
Foreign Countries Represented
25

Demographics

56.00%
Underrepresented Minorities
30.00%
International

39% female
61% male

Campus Life

Students Say

This slice of the UT population is “diverse in age, race, citizenship, and varying educa- tion backgrounds” and also happens to be “very nice and welcoming.” This diversity “enriches class discussions and takes topics into a global level.” As most students are working full-time, they commute in (“parking truly is a hassle on campus”), and the structure of the campus means that “unlike most schools, there are not spots students can go to” for long periods of downtime. This means there is not really much of a “scene of the university,” though “there are lots arts-related activities on campus” for those who are looking. Downtown Toledo itself “has lots of clubs and restaurants, an awesome ballpark, the Huntington Arena, the Art Museum, [and] the Valentine Theatre,” but it can be difficult to make time to take advantage. “People need to get down there and move around,” says a student.

More Information

% of Classrooms with Internet Access
100%

Campus-wide Internet Network
Yes

Internet Access for All Students
Yes

Admissions Office Contact

Contact
Kelly Barger
Graduate Enrollment and Brand Manager

Address
2801 W. Bancroft St.
MS 103
Toledo, OH 43606-3390
United States

Phone
419-530-5680

Fax
419-530-8498

Email
COBIGradPrograms@Utoledo.edu


Articles & Advice