See what students say:

Academics

Academics at Whitworth University are “challenging to the point that [students are] kept engaged, but not so hard [to make them] feel helpless.” Many find “one of Whitworth’s greatest strengths [to be] its small class sizes,” but overall the university simply provides a “very supportive community with a positive attitude.” They also appreciate that the community places an “emphasis on Christianity in the classroom and among professors” as well. As for those professors, one Whitworth Pirate notes “I really couldn’t ask for a better, more supportive group.” Others agree, describing the faculty as “wonderful,” “personable,” and “extremely knowledgeable.” Teachers are seemingly “always available for extra help” and will “work independently to … create meaningful relationships [with students] that prove to last beyond college.” Outside of the classroom, “Whitworth also offers a large number of off-campus opportunities, both within the United States and around the world.” Do note, however, that many of these are “spiritual opportunities for the Christian student,” though the school does not force students to participate. While some students feel that the school’s strong Christian background can hinder their growth, many acknowledge the university’s openness and acceptance of others. One declares, “No one is forcing you to attend chapel.” Another adds, “This school lets us have an opinion and somewhere to share it.”

Student Body

At Whitworth, you’ll find students who are “very into helping one another succeed in any and every way they possibly can.” To that end, attendees tend to be “open-minded,” “social,” and “caring” to the extent that “you won’t be able to walk through campus without receiving several warm smiles and greetings.” While they’re all driven to learn and succeed, “instead of focusing on competition, most … are just interested in helping themselves and others.” This establishes “a very kind and fun community to be a part of.” There’s also a variety and depth to what you’ll encounter in the company of fellow students, much of which “derives from the international student body, as it adds a lot of cultural benefits and awareness.” One student adds, “We all come from different backgrounds and it is very interesting to see how diverse the campus is.” As another sums it up: “Everyone [here] is unique in their own way, and that just seems to draw people closer.”

Campus Life

While many here “tend to fill their days with studying,” Whitworth features a very “down-to-earth campus, so it’s common to see students lounging in tree hammocks or just lying in the grass.” However, anyone seeking a little more activity will find plenty of opportunities here as well. When it’s sunny, hammocking is popular, as are outdoor sports like Frisbee Golf and Spike Ball. During the winter, “many people go up to the [nearby] mountains” to hike, mountain bike, or ski. Other popular spots during the colder months include nearby coffee shops and friends’ dorms where students will watch movies or finish schoolwork. As for school-sponsored happenings, “there are usually different events going on every weekend hosted by clubs.” Many of those organizations also “take into account [differences in] ethnicity, hobbies, and political backgrounds,” which those at Whitworth view as evidence that administration is “working hard to bring more diversity on campus.”

Overview

Applicants
3,731
Acceptance Rate
91%
Average HS GPA
3.63

GPA Breakdown

56%
Over 3.75
23%
3.50 - 3.74
13%
3.25 - 3.49
5%
3.00 - 3.24
3%
2.50 - 2.99

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SAT & ACT Test Scores

SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing
25th-75th percentile
(enrolled students)
550 - 650
SAT Math
25th-75th percentile
(enrolled students)
540 - 640
ACT Composite
25th-75th percentile (enrolled students)
21 - 28

Testing Policies


ACT Writing Policy
ACT with or without Writing accepted

SAT Essay Policy
SAT with or without Writing accepted

Deadlines

Early Action — November 15

Regular — August 1


Other Admission Factors

Academic

Academic GPA
Application Essay
Recommendation(s)

Selectivity Rating


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Faculty and Class Information

Student/Faculty
11:1
Total Faculty
314
with Terminal Degree
193

165
Men
149
Women
82
Minority

Most frequent class size
10 - 19
Most frequent lab / sub section size
10 - 19


Graduation Rates

Graduate in 4 years
68%
Graduate in 5 years
76%
Graduate in 6 years
79%

Majors

  • AREA, ETHNIC, CULTURAL, GENDER, AND GROUP STUDIES.

  • American/United States Studies/Civilization.
  • French Studies.

  • BIOLOGICAL AND BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES.

  • Biochemistry.
  • Bioinformatics.
  • Biology/Biological Sciences, General.
  • Biophysics.

  • BUSINESS, MANAGEMENT, MARKETING, AND RELATED SUPPORT SERVICES.

  • Accounting.
  • Business Administration and Management, General.
  • Finance, General.
  • Marketing/Marketing Management, General.

  • COMMUNICATION, JOURNALISM, AND RELATED PROGRAMS.

  • Communication, General.
  • Journalism.
  • Speech Communication and Rhetoric.

  • COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCES AND SUPPORT SERVICES.

  • Computer Science.
  • Information Technology.

  • EDUCATION.

  • Education, General.
  • Elementary Education and Teaching.
  • French Language Teacher Education.
  • Music Teacher Education.
  • Secondary Education and Teaching.
  • Spanish Language Teacher Education.
  • Special Education and Teaching, General.

  • ENGINEERING.

  • Engineering Physics/Applied Physics.
  • Engineering, General.

  • ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE/LETTERS.

  • English Language and Literature, General.

  • FOREIGN LANGUAGES, LITERATURES, AND LINGUISTICS.

  • French Language and Literature.
  • Spanish Language and Literature.

  • HEALTH PROFESSIONS AND RELATED PROGRAMS.

  • Community Health Services/Liaison/Counseling.
  • Health Services/Allied Health/Health Sciences, General.
  • Registered Nursing/Registered Nurse.

  • HISTORY.

  • History, General.

  • LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES, GENERAL STUDIES AND HUMANITIES.

  • General Studies.

  • MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS.

  • Mathematics, General.

  • MULTI/INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES.

  • Human Computer Interaction.
  • International/Global Studies.
  • Peace Studies and Conflict Resolution.

  • PARKS, RECREATION, LEISURE, AND FITNESS STUDIES.

  • Kinesiology and Exercise Science.

  • PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES.

  • Philosophy.

  • PHYSICAL SCIENCES.

  • Chemistry, General.
  • Physical Chemistry.
  • Physics, General.

  • PSYCHOLOGY.

  • Psychology, General.

  • SOCIAL SCIENCES.

  • Economics, General.
  • International Relations and Affairs.
  • Political Science and Government, General.
  • Sociology.

  • THEOLOGY AND RELIGIOUS VOCATIONS.

  • Bible/Biblical Studies.
  • Theology/Theological Studies.

  • VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS.

  • Art History, Criticism and Conservation.
  • Art/Art Studies, General.
  • Drama and Dramatics/Theatre Arts, General.
  • Fine and Studio Arts Management.
  • Music, General.


Degrees

Bachelor's
Master's
Post-Bachelor's certificate
Post-Master's certificate

Career Services

On-Campus Job Interviews Available
Yes

Career Services

Alumni Network
Alumni Services
Classes
Interest Inventory
Internships
Regional Alumni
Opportunities at School

Experiential
Internship

Notable Faculty


Prominent Alumni


Richard Carr
Chief of Chaplains, US Air Force

Michael LeRoy
President, Calvin College

Stephen Meyer
Executive Office of the Discovery Institute

David Myers
Social Psychologist and Author

Ralph Polson
Former NBA Player

Michael Allan
Drafted as tight end for Kansas City Chiefs

Sara Jackson-Holman
Singer, Songwriter

Academic Rating

Graduation Rates

Graduate in 4 years
68%
Graduate in 5 years
76%
Graduate in 6 years
79%

Career Services

On-Campus Job Interviews Available
Yes

Career Services

Alumni Network
Alumni Services
Classes
Interest Inventory
Internships
Regional Alumni
Opportunities at School

Experiential
Internship

ROI & Outcomes

Dates

Application Deadlines
Notification Date
Jan 17

Required Forms

FAFSA

Financial Aid Statistics

Average Freshman Total Need-Based Gift Aid
$34,028

Average Undergraduate Total Need-Based Gift Aid
$30,617

Average Need-Based Loan
$4,492

Undergraduates who have borrowed through any loan program
66%

Average amount of loan debt per graduate
$29,442

Average amount of each freshman scholarship/grant package
$33,221

Financial aid provided to international students
Yes

Expenses per Academic Year

Tuition
$43,800
Required Fees
$1,140
Average Cost for Books and Supplies
$912

Tuition / Fees Vary by Year of Study
No
Board for Commuters
$3,366
Transportation for Commuters
$1,200

On-Campus Room and Board
$11,800
Comprehensive Fee

Available Aid

Financial Aid Methodology
Federal

Scholarships and Grants

Need-Based
 

Need-Based College/University Scholarship or Grant Aid from Institutional Funds
Need-Based Federal Pell
Need-Based Private Scholarships
Need-Based SEOG
Need-Based State Scholarships

Non-Need-Based
Institutional non-need-based scholarship or grant aid is available

Federal Direct Student Loan Programs
Direct PLUS Loans
Direct Subsidized Stafford Loans
Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans

Federal Family Education Loan Programs (FFEL)
College/university loans from institutional funds
Federal Perkins Loans

Is Institutional Employment Available (other than Federal Work Study)
Yes

Direct Lender
No

Financial Aid Rating

Overall


Student Body Profile

Total Undergraduate Enrollment
2,355
Foreign Countries Represented
35

Demographics

4.79%
Asian
2.09%
African-American
10.31%
Hispanic
68.10%
Caucasian
3.66%
International

60% female
40% male
26% are out of state
98% are full time
2% are part time

Overview


Campus Life

Undergrads living on campus
45%
Help finding off-campus housing
Yes

First-Year Students living on campus
91%

Campus Environment
Small Urban

Housing Options

Disabled Student
Dorms Coed
Dorms Female
Dorms Male
Theme Housing

Special Needs Admissions

Program / Service Name
Educational Support Services

Type of Program
For all students with disabilities

Director
Katie McCray

College Entrance Tests Required
No

Interview Required
No

Documentation Required for LD

1. Be prepared by a professional QUALIFIED BY EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE to diagnose learning disabilities, which would include but not limited to: a licensed neuropsychologist or psychologist; clinical or educational psychologist; learning disability specialist or other appropriate professional certified to administer standardized psychological tests/statements identified below. Experience in evaluation of adults with learning disabilities is an essential requirement in this process. 2. Be COMPREHENSIVE. All tests administered must be age appropriate, nationally normed, individually administered. a. APTITUDE. The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale - Third Edition (WAIS-III) with subtest scores is preferred. The Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery Revised: Tests of Cognitive Ability is acceptable. WJ Reading Mastery 3rd Ed. b. ACHIEVEMENT. Current levels of functioning in all areas in which student accommodations are requested. Acceptable instruments include the Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery Revised: Tests of Achievement; Stanford Test of Academic Skills (TASK); or specific achievement tests such as the Test of Written Language 3 (TOWL-3), Woodcock Reading Mastery Tests Revised 3rd Ed. or the Stanford Diagnostic Mathematics Test. (The Wide Range Achievement Test Revised is NOT a comprehensive measure of achievement and therefore is not suitable.) c. COGNITIVE/INFORMATION PROCESSING ABILITIES. Specific areas of information processing (e.g. short and long term memory, sequential memory, auditory and visual perception/processing, (WMS-III) and/or subtests from the WAIS III, the Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Cognitive Ability, or neuropsychological test instruments assessing cognitive domain above are acceptable. The above tests are NOT intended to be an exhaustive list or restrict assessments in other pertinent and helpful areas such as vocational interest, aptitudes and learning strengths. Rather they are guidelines to direct the areas needing assessment. 3. BE CURRENT. In most cases, this means within the past three years (36 months). Since assessment constitutes the basis for determining reasonable accommodations, it is in the student's best interest to provide recent and appropriate documentation to serve as the basis for decision-making about a student's needs for accommodations in an academically competitive environment. Retesting may not be required if a qualified medical professional determines it is not medically necessary. 4. Present CLEAR AND SPECIFIC EVIDENCE, which identifies and states specific learning disabilities. Individual "learning styles" and "learning differences" in and of themselves do NOT specify a documented learning disability. 5. INCLUDE in the report: the exact instruments used, any exceptions to standardized procedures, test score data in percentiles or standard scores, a written interpretation of the results by the professional doing the evaluation, the name of the evaluation/professional and dates of testing. 6. Provide a list of recommended ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATIONS, with SUPPORTING DATA from the assessment, which is specific to the individual assessed. Requests which are not supported by the documentation may not be approved without additional verification and documentation (to be determined by the institution's committee members).

Documentation Required for ADHD

1. Be prepared by a professional who has comprehensive training in differential diagnosis and direct experience working with adolescents and adults with ADHD, which may include: clinical psychologists, neuropsychologists, psychiatrists, and other relevantly trained medical doctors; 2. be current. The provision of all reasonable accommodations and services is based upon the assessment of the current impact of the disability on academic performance. The diagnostic evaluation should show the current level of functioning and impact of the disability; 3. be comprehensive. Minimally, areas to be addressed should include: a. evidence of early and current impairment. Diagnostic assessment should consist of more than a self-report. A diagnostic feature? as presented in the DSM-IV ? is that ADHD is first exhibited in childhood, and manifests itself in more than one setting. Therefore, a comprehensive assessment typically includes a clinical summary of objective historical information garnered from sources such as transcripts, report cards, teacher comments, tutoring evaluations, psycho-educational testing, medical history, employment history, family history, and third party interviews when available; b. alternative diagnoses or explanations should be ruled out. Possible alternative diagnoses including medical, psychiatric disorders, and educational or cultural factors affecting the individual that may result in behaviors mimicking ADHD should be explored; c. testing information must be relevant. Test scores or subtest scores alone should not be used as a sole measure for the diagnostic decision regarding ADHD. Selected subtest scores from measures of intellectual ability, memory functions tests, attention or tracking tests, or continuous performance tests do not in-and-of-themselves establish the presence or absence of ADHD. Checklists and/or surveys can serve to supplement the diagnostic profile, but are not adequate for the diagnosis of ADHD; 4. if applicable, present a specific diagnosis of ADHD based on the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. The diagnostician should use direct language in the diagnosis of ADHD, avoiding the use of such terms as: "attention problems," "suggests...," or "is indicative of...." 5. provide a comprehensive interpretive summary synthesizing the evaluator's judgment for the diagnosis. The report should include: all quantitative information in standard scores and/or percentiles, all relevant developmental, familial, medical, medication, psychosocial, behavioral and academic information; and a clear identification of the substantial limitation of a major life function presented by the ADHD.

Special Need Services Offered

Calculator allowed in exams
Yes

Dictionary allowed in exams
Yes

Computer allowed in exams
Yes

Spellchecker allowed in exams
Yes

Extended test time
Yes

Scribes
Yes

Proctors
Yes

Oral exams
Yes

Notetakers
Yes

Distraction-free environment
Yes

Reading machine
Yes

Other assistive technology
Yes

Student Activities

Registered Student Organizations
46
Number of Honor Societies
1

Number of Social Sororities
0
Number of Religious Organizations
20

Sports

Athletic Division
Division III

59% participate in intramural sports
18% participate in intercollegiate sports

Men's Sports (Pirates)
10 Sports

Baseball
Basketball
Cross Country
Football
Golf
Soccer
Swimming
Tennis
Track Field Indoor
Track Field Outdoor
Women's Sports (Pirates)
11 Sports

Basketball
Cross Country
Golf
Lacrosse
Soccer
Softball
Swimming
Tennis
Track Field Indoor
Track Field Outdoor
Volleyball

Student Services

Health
LGBT Support Groups
Minority Support Groups
Army ROTC Offered at cooperating institutions: Gonzaga University

Sustainability


Campus Security Report

Campus Security Report

The Jeanne Clery Act requires colleges and universities to disclose their security policies, keep a public crime log, publish an annual crime report and provide timely warnings to students and campus employees about a crime posing an immediate or ongoing threat to students and campus employees.

Please visit The Princeton Review’s page on campus safety for additional resources: http://www.princetonreview.com/safety

The Princeton Review publishes links directly to each school's Campus Security Reports where available. Applicants can also access all school-specific campus safety information using the Campus Safety and Security Data Analysis Cutting Tool provided by the Office of Postsecondary Education of the U.S. Department of Education: http://ope.ed.gov/security


Other Information

Campus-wide Internet Network
Yes

% of Classrooms with Wireless Internet
100

Fee for Network Use
No

Partnerships with Technology Companies
No

Personal computer included in tuition for each student
No

Discounts Available with Hardware Vendors
No

Campus Visits Contact

Contact
Quincy McCune
Campus Visit Coordinator

Address
Office of Admissions
300 West Hawthorne Road
Spokane, WA 99251

Phone
800-533-4668

Email
admissions@whitworth.edu

Experience College Life

Most Popular Places On Campus
Hixson Student Union Building Mind & Hearth Coffee Shop
University Rec Center
Robinson Science Center
Cowles Music Center
Fieldhouse
Student Union Building includes dining halls, student center, bookstore, Associated Students of Whitworth University offices, radio station, career services. University Rec Center has an indoor track, climbing wall, courts and fitness center. The science building has state of the art labs, including a cadaver lab. Cowles Music Center opened in 2016 and has new rehearsal spaces for choral & instrumental ensembles as well as teaching studios, and practice rooms.

Most Popular Places Off Campus
Greenbluff-orchards, farms. Popular duirng fall.
Riverfront Park - site of 1974 World's Fair
Northtown mall - within 15 minutes from campus.
Hoopfest - largest 3 on 3 basketball tournament in the USA.
Bloomsday - 10K race through the streets of Spokane - almost 50000 runners.

Campus Tours

Campus Tours
Appointment Required: Yes
Dates: Year-round
Times: Varies
Average Length: 1 hour

On Campus Interview

Campus Interviews
Yes

Information Sessions
Available

Times
Everyday M-F

Faculty and Coach Visits

Dates/Times Available
Academic Year

Arrangements
Contact Admissions Office

Advance Notice
1 week

Contact Email Address for Visit
visitus@whitworth.edu

Class Visits

Dates/Times Available
Academic Year

Arrangements
Contact Admissions Office

Overnight Dorm Stays

Overnight Dorm Stays
Available

Arrangements
Contact Admissions Office

Limitations
Overnights not available during summer term or student breaks.

Transportation

Types of Transportation Available to Campus
Taxis ? to travel to the campus proper Shuttle service available for prospective students traveling unaccompanied by a parent/guardian. Can travel to Spokane via train, bus and air. Spokane International Airport

Driving Instructions to Campus
From West: I-90 to Maple Street Bridge Exit. North on Maple Street for 6 miles to Country Homes Blvd. At light and corner of Country Homes Blvd. and Wall, turn left on Wall. Travel approximately 1.5 miles to traffic light, turn right onto Hawthorne, college entrance on left. From East: I-90 to Division Street Exit. North on Division/Ruby corridor approximately 7 miles. Turn left onto Hawthorne Road. College entrance on the right.

Local Accommodations
The following hotels are recommended by the university: Quality Inn Oakwood located 1.8 miles south of campus; La Quinta Inn located .8 miles southeast of campus.


Articles & Advice